Genealogy tools, Montet Family

Montes who aren’t Montets

In researching the Montet family, I often look at what could be misspellings of the name. Sometimes I strike gold. Other times, I find Montes who aren’t Montets.

That’s what happened when I looked at New Orleans death records. I’m sharing what I found in case they’re useful to someone else.

Here’s Mary Alice Monte, the daughter of John R. Monte and Alice Scroggins:

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John and Alice also lost a son:

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Newspaper articles, Riddles, St. Mary Parish Genealogy

The exasperating, frustrating and altogether annoying LeBlancs

Because I like a challenge, I’ve been trying to sort out the LeBlanc family. It’s like tumbling down a rabbit hole after a white rabbit. It just gets curiouser and curiouser.

Josephine Emiline Templet married Etienne Carville LeBlanc. in 1867. Josephine was the sister of my g-g-g-grandmother Anaise Templet. Anaise – I think – was actually christened Marie Heloise. Maybe it was supposed to be Marie Anaise, and the priest wrote it down wrong. I have no idea. All I know is we’re about to get into a trend.

Josephine didn’t go by Josephine. She didn’t go by Emiline. She was Eveline or Evalina.

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Pete’s war registration record, where he decided to go by his actual name.

Her husband, Etienne Carville, didn’t go by Etienne Carville. He was Pete, except on his Civil War draft registration, when he put down his middle name of Carville. Pete worked on the railroad and then became a ferryman in Morgan City.

Pete and Eveline had a lot of kids. I think I’ve blogged before about the confusion involving their names, but I’ll revisit since I’ve learned more. Basically,  baptism records record their kids’ names as one thing. Census records completely disagree for the most part. I’ll list the baptismal name first and put the census name in parenthesis.

Onezime Eugenie, 1867 (Olivia in 1880)

Almina Marie, 1869 (Elvena in 1880)

Odille Carmelite, 1870 (Odelia in 1880 – yeah!!)

Clarity Ozemee, 1872 (Clovis in 1880)

Oscar Francois, 1875 (not listed in 1880)

Mary Seraphine, 1877 (Josephine in 1880)

Joseph Arthur, 1879 (Joseph in 1880 and Arthur in 1900)

Peter Clarfey, 1881 (Clifford in 1900)

Eugenie Philomene, 1883 (Jennie in 1900)

So … I know that Jennie – the baby – married Aubin Picou and had children before dying in the 1950s. The rest of the kids were a mystery until I finally traced Peter Clarfey/Clifford only to find that he didn’t go by any of those names later in life.

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Clifford/William LeBlanc in 1910 before his wife died. 

Clifford – as he was known in a mangled fashion on the 1910 census – married May Bell Bigler and had five children.

May Bell died young. The kids went to live with her relations. Clifford then pops up in New Orleans – as William or Willie – and marries a Catherine Fallosio. They have five children.

In 1929, Clifford/William dies, leaving behind a pregnant widow. The kids – sadly – are sent to.an orphanage.

Even Clifford/William’s kids’ names are confusing. He and Catherine seemed to have had two Williams and two Clifftons as sons.

But Catherine’s story also is a name game puzzle.

Her father was James Fallosio, who served as a deputy in Orleans Parish and seemed to be quick to pull the trigger on his gun. Newspaper reports on those shootings casually mention that James Fallosio sometimes was known as James Sebastian. What the heck?

It turns out that James’ full name was James Sebastian Fallosio, but he sometimes just dropped the surname. Even his kids sometimes listed their last name as Sebastian.

And this is why genealogy is a twisting, winding road of frustration.

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James was no stranger to an alcohol-infused brawl. 

James, by the way, died in 1903 during a barroom shooting. Apparently a dispute erupted over some dope that James tried to pass to a prisoner in exchange for money.

I have no idea what name he was buried under. Probably LeBlanc. Just kidding.

 

Montet Family, Newspaper articles, St. Mary Parish Genealogy

Newspaper notes from Amelia

Miss Marple once said that local newspapers are always a useful source of information. As always, Miss Marple was right.

Here are some terribly misspelled notes from the town of Amelia in the early 1900s. I found my g-g-grandparents, Augustin and Elizabeth Giroir.

Saturday, July 27, 1918

Mrs. E. P. Schwing and children of Morgan City are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Schwing of Amelia for a few days.

Mr. H. A. Rentrop went to New Orleans Friday, where he will take a position at the S. P. machine shop in Algiers.

Mr. Dewey Vigene of Algiers spending some time at Amelia with Mr. and Mrs. A. Verret.

Wilton Rentrop, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Rentrop, is on the sick list this week.

Mr. Earl Barrilleaux, who has been working at the shipyard in Morgan City, is now spending a few days with relatives in Amelia.

Miss Rosa Rentrop has been informed by the War Department that Mr. J. Allen Thompson of the U.S. Naval Reserves has arrived in France safely.

Tuesday, Aug. 6, 1918

Mrs. A. E. Pension and children left Sunday for New Orleans to visit her sister, Mrs. W. Verret.

Mrs. Clement Landry and Miss Agnes Barrilleaux were the guests of Mrs. J. J. Greenwood at Ramos Friday.

Mrs. A. J. Mahony of Glenwild is spending some time with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Rentrop of Amelia.

Dr. and Mrs. J. T. Prosser and daughter, Edmay, have returned from Alexandria after visiting relatives there.

Miss Bertha Patureau of Plaquemines left here Sunday after spending several weeks with her brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Allen Patureau.

Mr. John Mahony of Glenwild spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Rentrop Sr.

Mr. Lovelace Blanco has returned home after spending several days in Orange, Texas.

Mr. Robt. Morrison spent Saturday and Sunday in Morgan City the guest of Miss Alice Smith of Lake Bridge, who is visiting her sister, Mrs. Fauchet.

Mrs. R.C. Robicheaux and daughter, Aline, of San Antonio, Texas, is spending some time with her sister, Mrs. Eugene Theriot of Amelia.

Mr. Earl Barrilleaux has returned from New Orleans, having failed in examination for enlistment in the navy. He will return to the city in two weeks.

Thursday, Aug. 8, 1918

Mr. C. H. Barrielleaux spent Sunday with relatives here.

Mrs. Philips, Miss Philips ands Miss White of Alexandria is spending some time with Dr. and Mrs. J. T. Prosser at Amelia.

There are many cases of charbon among the live stock at Amelia and is causing heavy loss to the community.

Mr. Louis Giroia, son of Mr. and Mrs. Augustin Giroia, left here Tuesday for Napoleonville. From there, he will be sent to a training camp for service in the United States army.

Miss Cleona Blanco is spending a few days in Morgan City.

Mr. Douglas Vining of Morgan City spent Monday and Tuesday at Amelia.

Mr. Sidney David of Amelia will leave Napoleonville Wednesday with a number of drafted men for training camps. His many friends wish him much success.

Saturday, Aug. 10, 1918

Mr. A. E. Pension was in Morgan City Thursday.

Mrs. A. J. Mahony returned to her home in

Glenwild after spending a few days at Amelia as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Rentrop.

Mr. Sidney Barras went to Morgan City on business Friday.

Miss Edna Blanco of Amelia, daughter of Mr. B. Blanco, was quietly married Wednesday evening to Mr. Edward Bergeron, son of Mr. and Mrs. V. Bergeron of Ramos.

Eugene Rentrop, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Rentrop Jr., is on the sick list this week.

Miss Alice Smith of Lake Bridge has returned to her home after spending several days in Morgan City.

The weather for a few weeks has been so rainy that the farmers of this section are unable to plant their fall potatoes. It is feared that there will be a very small crop this year. Although this rainy weather is not good for the planting of potatoes, it is very beneficial to the cane crop.

Messrs. Clement Landry, B. Blanco, Ettienne Giroir and Noah Landry went to Morgan City in a gasoline boat Thursday.

Monday, Nov. 11, 1918

Mrs. W. H. Rentrop was called to the bedside of her mother, Beadle who was formerly of this place. Her body was brought here Saturday morning. Funeral services was held from St. Andrew’s Catholic Church.

Mr. Joe Bourg was in Morgan City Friday.

Mrs. J. S. Dellucky of this place and son, Ernest, of New Orleans returned here Friday from Camp Beauregard, where they visited Private Frank Dellucky, who is at the Base Hospital having undergone an operation.

Mr. Oleus Pension, son of Mr. Alexson Pension, died here Friday at noon from at attack of influenza. A brother, Adeo, died from pneumonia two weeks ago. Besides his father, Mr. Penisson is survived by three sisters and one brother and other relatives. Funeral services were held Saturday morning from the Catholic Church.

Friday, Nov. 29, 1918

Mr. Eddie Barrilleaux of Centerville spent a few hours here Monday.

Mr. Willie Auction was in Morgan City Tuesday.

Mr. Roy Nutta returned to Patterson Tuesday after working here several days.

Mr. Anidas Lajounis left for Centerville Wednesday where he will work for some time.

Mrs. Willie Auction and daughter Miss Edna went to New Orleans Tuesday.

Mr. Adrien Barrilleaux, Noah Landry and Emile Barrilleaux are now working at Cotton Bros near Morgan City.

It has been raining here for several days and the farmers are unable to haul their cane to the wharves.

Mrs. T. Auction and daughter Mrs. Prosser are spending a few days in New Orleans.

Monday, Dec. 16, 1918

Mr. Simoneaux of Avolon was the guest of his son Mr. Walter for a few days this week.

Mr. Jos. Tellette was a business visitor to Morgan City Friday.

Mrs. J. S. Dellucky spent one day this week with her daughter, Mrs. Lyn Arceneaux in Morgan City.

Beg to acknowledge that it was a false report about Bugler John Blanchard being wounded. It was a telegram telling that he had been gassed.

Mr. Clement Landry was in Morgan City Friday.

Mrs. Sidney Barras has returned home from the St. Mary Hospital, accompanied by her sister Miss Dugas.

Messrs. A. Barrilleaux and A. E. Pennison were visitors to Morgan City Friday.

Tuesday, Dec. 24, 1918

Mr. C.C. Pension of Algiers is spending a few days here, the guest of his brother-in-law and sister, Mr. And Mrs. A. H. Rentrop Jr.

Mr. Henry Dellucky has returned home from Camp Pike, where he was mustered out of service.

Mrs. A. H. Rentrop of Algiers came Sunday to spend Christmas with relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Arceneaux and son, Junior, of Morgan City spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Dellucky and family.

Mr. Sidney Barras, who has been working in Chacahoula, is spending the holidays with his family here.

Messrs. A. E. Pennison and A. Barrilleaux are spending a few days with their families here.

Mr. O. J. Blanchard will return to his home in Scott Mond.

Messrs. Easton and Lester Domangue of Ramos spent Sunday here with friends.

Mr. C. Landry was in Morgan City Saturday.

Miss Edna Aucoin spent Saturday and Sunday here with her parents.

Private Guy Thibodeaux of Camp Shelby, Miss., is here on a few days’ furlough, the guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Thibodeaux.

Mr. Anidas Lajounie returned home Saturday from Centreville where he spent some time.

Thursday, Dec. 26, 1918

Messrs. A. H. Rentrop Jr., Walter Simoneaux and A. E. Pennison were business visitors to Morgan City Monday.

Misses Annie and Inez Tellotte were visitors to Morgan City Monday.

Messrs. Emile Barrilleaux and Noah Landry are spending the Xmas holidays here, from Cotton Bros.

Mr. Percy Schwing was in Morgan City Monday on business.

Messrs. C. Landry and Earl Barrilleaux went to Morgan City in boat Monday.

Miss Pearl Schwig of Lake Charles is spending the holidays here with relatives.

Genealogy tools

Alexandria in 1872

Screen Shot 2019-04-02 at 12.33.58 PM.pngHere’s a fascinating map of the town of Alexandria in 1872. Before the population explosion that started around 1900, mapmakers could be very detailed.

The entire map is here: https://www.loc.gov/resource/g4014a.ct001186/?r=0.282,0.062,0.15,0.095,0

But I’ve zoomed in to show you just how detailed it is.

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Can you see yet what it shows? I’ll zoom in more.

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Yep! It has actual names. I’m not sure if these were businesses or residences. My guess is it was a mixture of both.

 

 

Genealogy tools, Military Records

Mathew Brady’s Civil War Photos

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Mathew Brady – or someone in his team – captured this image of Oscar James Dunn, who was lieutenant governor of Louisiana and the first African American lieutenant governor in the U.S. It’s said he died of arsenic poisoning.

No doubt, you’ve heard of Mathew Brady. He was a photographer who captured invaluable images of the Civil War.

His photos are free – at least for now = on Fold3.

I looked for my g-g-grandfather, J.S. Hebert. Alas, I didn’t find him.

But I did find a little bit of a dispute between the National Archives and the descendants of William Jasper Blackburn.

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Is this John or William?

This photo is identified as John A. S. Blackburn. The family says it’s actually William Jasper Blackburn, who represented Louisiana in Congress.

The only other photo of William Jasper that I could find is on his findagrave page. And it’s the same Mathew Brady photo. So I don’t know who’s right.

 

Genealogy tools

Louisiana Digital Library

Did you know that Louisiana offers an online, digital library with “more than 144,000 digital items from Louisiana archives, libraries, museums, and other repositories, making unique historical treasure accessible to students, researchers, and the general public in Louisiana and across the globe?”

Sounds exciting, huh?

So let’s see what’s there. First, here’s the handy dandy link: http://www.louisianadigitallibrary.org/

The library draws on a number of other archives: the Louisiana State Museum, state universities, Vermilionville Living History Museum (a must if you’re ever in Acadiana), etc.

Some of it is interesting. Some of it is not, at least to me. But some of it gets more interesting than you’d at first think.

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A report on people who died in New Orleans from yellow fever in 1878. 

I took a dive into the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans. Frankly, I wasn’t expecting to be enthused. But I found a yellow fever collection that intrigued me. Everything you’d want to know about yellow fever is in there.

Buried in the collection is a report on New Orleans yellow fever deaths in 1878.

Nicholls has a collection on veterans of Southeast Louisiana.

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Emilene Ann Bourgeois in her dress uniform. 

The university interviewed local veterans and collected photographs and stories from them. The interviews were videotaped. You can look through the gallery of photos online.

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The Strand under construction in the 1920s. Notice the old-fashioned cars on the street to the left. 

LSU-Shreveport has collected photos of the Strand Theater in downtown Shreveport. This is a grand theater that hosts movies and plays. My parents took me to see “Singin In the Rain” there when I was a kid. It was a special screening (I’m not that old!), and I was so struck by the palace-style movie theater that it was hard to watch the movie itself! Howard Hughes once holed up in a hotel just around the corner from the Strand when he was staying in Shreveport for a bit.

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Here’s a residence that had seen better days in Pointe Coupee Parish. 

The Louisiana State Museum collection doesn’t disappoint. It has amassed a treasure trove of materials, including photographs and oral histories.

Just of the museum’s collection is a series of house photos. You’ll find residences that no longer stand.