obituaries, terrebonne parish

Obits from Gibson, La.

An assortment of deaths in Gibson, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, from early newspapers:

The Times-Democrat: Sept. 20, 1895

Thomas Bloomfield, colored, while attempting to get on a moving train yesterday at Gibson, La. had both legs cut off. He was brought to this city and taken to the hospital, where he died at 7:30.

The Times-Democrat: March 1, 1898

Screen Shot 2018-11-12 at 4.48.54 PM.pngInformation reached this city last night of the death at Gibson, La., of Mrs. Annie E. Knight, one of the oldest and most lovable residents of Terrebonne parish. Mrs. Knight was the widow of the late James McClellan Knight of Terrebonne, whom she married in 1844. She was born in Henderson, Union county, Ky., and was the daughter of James Alexander Jarvis, who emigrated from Kentucky to Louisiana in 1837. Mr. Jarvis soon acquired the Jarvis plantation on Bayou Black, near Gibson, which still remains in possession of the family.

When Mr. Jarvis left Kentucky his daughter was a student at St. Vincent Convent, near Henderson, where she remained until 1841. When her education was completed, she removed to Terrebonne parish, where she has resided continuously since.

Mrs. Knight was the mother of 10 children, seven of whom survive her, two grown sons having died recently. Seven years ago she was attacked by an incurable disease and has since been a confirmed invalid, tenderly nursed by her youngest daughter, Miss Laura, and other children. Throughout her long illness Mrs. Knight bore her sufferings without complaint, always interesting herself in the affairs and comfort of those around her and showing a rare example of Christian fortitude and resignation.

The Times-Democrat: Feb. 27, 1899

L. Lacassagne was drowned in Bayou Black near Gibson, La., yesterday.

The Times-Picayune: Jan. 28, 1900

Gibson, La. – Mrs. James Canning, a highly respected resident of this neighborhood, died yesterday at her late home on Hope farm, and was buried from the Roman Catholic church this evening. The deceased, who was a native of Ireland, was 56 years of age and leaves a husband and six children to mourn her loss.

The Semi-Weekly Times-Democrat: July 9, 1901

Gibson, La. – Your correspondent was misinformed last night as to the party who killed young Ed Thibodeaux last evening. The gun and hat of Gilbert Dedrick Jr., colored, were found this morning where the killing occurred and as Dedrick is missing, it is supposed he is the guilty party. Hounds from Lafourche were put on the trail this morning and tracked the murderer for several miles through the swamp until a heavy rain caused them to lose the trail. The killing is shrouded in mystery. The remains of young Thibodeaux were taken to Thibodaux for burial this afternoon.

The Times-Democrat: April 21, 1902

Screen Shot 2018-11-12 at 3.56.33 PM.pngGibson, La. – Judge F. R. Richard, aged 54 years, for many years a prominent businessman of this place, and for several years judge of the Eighth Judicial Court of Terrebonne parish, died here at 5 o’clock this evening of heart trouble. Interment will take place tomorrow evening in the Roman Catholic Cemetery.

The Times-Democrat: May 8, 1904

Richaud – At Gibson, on Tuesday, April 26, 1904, Burton Lawrence, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Richaud, aged 3 months and 4 days.

The Times-Democrat: Jan. 24, 1905

Gibson – A white man who worked for Clark’s show that left here this morning called a colored man’s house yesterday saying he was sick and wanted a bed, which was given him. He died today without disclosing his identity and will be buried tomorrow at the expense of the parish, in the Catholic cemetery. Inquest was held over the body and it was found that he came to his death by excessive drinking.

The Times-Democrat: Feb. 8, 1905

Mrs. John Walther died this morning, aged 34 years. She leaves seven children, ranging in age from 12 years to six days, besides mother, brother and sister.

The Times-Democrat: Sept. 5, 1905

Gibson – H. L. Soulis, a merchant of Gibson, died this morning after an illness of about one year. His remains were taken in charge by the Masons of Gibson and after services at the residence were sent to New Orleans by an evening train for burial in the Masonic Cemetery as he was a member of Ocean Lodge No. 144, A.F. and A.M., of New Orleans. He leaves a wife and one brother, as well as numerous friends to mourn his death.

The Times-Democrat: Jan. 13, 1906

WALTHER – At Touro Infirmary, in New Orleans, at 11 o’clock a.m., Philip Walther Sr. of Gibson, a native of Alsace, aged 83 years, 7 months and 20 days.

Funeral at Gibson, La., Saturday, Jan. 13, 1906, at 3:30 p.m.

He leaves to mourn his loss four sons, Henry, Charles, John and Phillip Walther Jr., all of Gibson, 32 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild.

The Town Talk – March 29, 1912

A deplorable accident occurred near here (Gibson). Two small boys were victims of the mishap. One was instantly killed and the other was fatally wounded.

Two sons of Albert Hebert were playing with a Winchester rifle, unaware of the fact that it was loaded. Suddenly the weapon was discharged. One boy was killed outright and the other received fatal wounds.

The Times-Democrat: July 24, 1913

Mrs. D.C. McIntire Sr. died in New Orleans at Hotel Dieu Tuesday morning at 8 o’clock after an illness of two weeks. Her remains were brought here Tuesday evening and interred in the local cemetery. Mrs. McIntire was 55 years of age and had been a lifelong resident of Gibson. She leaves the following relatives: Eight sons John D.C. Jr., James, Claude, Andrew, Fred and Dewey, and one daughter Mollie, also a sister Mrs. G.H. Penderavis of Houston.

The Times-Democrat: Aug. 10, 1913

Gibson, La. – Evalture Foucheaux, aged 78 years, a highly respected citizen of this place for the past 33 years, died Thursday at 5 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. R. L. Carlin, after an illness of about two weeks. Mr. Foucheaux leaves the following children, besides a number of grandchildren and great grandchildren: Thomas, of this place, Joseph of Franklin, Richard of Houma, Ernest of Lockport, Mrs. Paul Larrieu of Rockdale, Tex., Mrs. Robert Larkin and Mrs. Robert Carlin of this place.

Weekly Town Talk: Aug. 19, 1916

Gibson, La. – The body of Henry J. King was found yesterday morning in the woods near his residence with a gunshot wound in his neck. His gun with one barrel discharged was found near him.

The verdict of the coroner’s jury impaneled by the acting coroner, Philip Walther, was King was killed accidentally. He leaves a wife and several children, besides two or three brothers. He will be buried in the Sycamore cemetery today, Rev. G. L. Tucker of Houma officiating, assisted by Oak Grove Camp 118 Woodmen of the World, of which he was a member.

The Daily Review: Jan. 21, 1925

Mrs. Louise Rose Roddy Picou, wife of Alfred Picou of Gibson, La., died there recently. Deceased was 77 years and two months of age. Her loss is mourned by a husband, seven daughters and three sons; the daughters Mrs. A. E. Bourgeois, Mrs. J. G. Roberts of Morgan City, Mrs. A. L. Chandalier, Liberty, Texas, Mrs. D.C. Shriner, Houston, Texas, Miss Grace Picou, Houston, Texas, Mrs. R.A. Veret, Gibson, La., Mrs. Alice Fandall, Gibson; the sons Mr. A. J. Picou, Donner, Mr. John Picou, Gibson, Robert Picou, Chicago.

The deceased had a sister in Lafayette, one in Homer and a brother in Homer. She had 34 grandchildren and six great grandchildren.

 

 

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