Ascension Parish Genealogy, Newspaper articles

Donaldsonville Daily Times – June 1896

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JUNE 1, 1896

The funeral of the late Mr. James Teller, who died at his home on the Riverside plantation on Friday afternoon, took place at the Jesuit church, New Orleans, on Saturday, interment being made in the Metairie cemetery in that city.

At half past five o’clock on Saturday morning the body of the deceased was removed from the room where it had been prepared for burial and placed in the hearse and followed by the relatives and friends and all the employees of the plantation, the cortege started for the T. and P. depot to take the 6 o’clock train.

Just inside the city limits the fire department in full uniform and led by Chief Engineer Thos. Cook, was lined up and took its place at the head of the cortege acting as a special escort to the remains. When the hearse reached the depot, the firemen drew up in line with uncovered heads while the coffin was carried between them to the station platform. As it passed they fell in line back of it and remained on duty as a guard to the body of him whom every fireman loved and delighted in calling a friend.

When the funeral procession left the house, the fire bells began tolling and kept up their mournful cadence until the train had passed the city limits.

At the depot there was a large concourse of friends of the deceased, many of whom accompanied the remains to New Orleans. Among them were: Messrs. R. and Henry McCall, Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Kock, Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Webster and their niece Miss Freret, Sisters Clothilde and Julienne, Mr. John Landry, Mr. Jacob Lebermuth and Mr. E.N. Pugh.

Upon the return of the firemen to their hall, a meeting was held presided over by Chief Engineer Cook and the following committee was appointed to prepare resolutions of regrets and sympathy.

Phoenix: W.G. Wilkinson, D. Variani.

Hooks: L.E. Bentley, C. Kline, P. Reddington.

Volunteers: John F. Terrio, Chas. Langbecker, August Heine.

This committee will meet some time this week to prepare the resolutions which will be reported at the next meeting of the department.

Hook and Ladder hall has been draped in mourning and will wear these habiliments of respect for the next thirty days.

The Planters Club has also draped their building in respect to his memory and formal action will be taken at the next meeting of the Board of Directors.

Upon arrival of the train at Gouldsboro, a hearse was in awaiting and the body taken to Johnson’s undertaking parlors, New Orleans. Here the last offices for the preparation for the tomb were made and the body was then placed on view to the many friends of the deceased in that city.

The parlors were well filled throughout the early afternoon, among those present being many of the city’s most prominent gentleman.

The funeral party on leaving the train were driven to the city home of the deceased where they remained until the hour set for the funeral.

Despite the rain the Jesuit Church on Baronne, near Canal streets, was filled, a large delegation being present from the Sugar Exchange. At the conclusion of the sad services, the body was borne from the church to the hearse by the following pall bearers: Messrs. E. N. Pugh, James P. Kock, George A. Williams, John F. Landry, Jacob Lebermuth, S. M. Rodd, Henry Braud and James Von Lotten. The interment was made in the family tomb in Metairie Cemetery.

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A well known colored man named Charley Kling was up before the Mayor this morning on a charge of allowing card playing in his place on Railroad avenue. After a severe lecture and an admonition from the Mayor not to repeat the offense, he was discharged.

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A terrible runaway accident which may result in the death of Emmet, the little son of Capt. W. S. Cary, took place at noon today opposite the Masonic confectionary.

The horse, which belonged to Jos. Aymar, of Winchester, St. James, has been left, standing in front of the foundry, hitched to a light sulky.

Through some reasons as yet unknown, the animal took fright and started on a dead run. When it reached the corner of Railroad avenue and Claiborne street, it took to the sidewalk and at a mad pace came tearing down the avenue. Several persons met with most narrow escape but it was not until between the Times office and the Masonic confectionary that any serious damage was done. At this point, Emmet and Ray Cary were on the sidewalk and before they realized their danger the horse was on them. Ray jumped from the walk and saved himself but little Emmet was hit by one of the wheels and thrown violently to the sidewalk. Quick as a flash, with a presence of mind that was really wonderful for one so young, Clarence Cary, brother of the injured child, picked him up and run like mad for his home. When he reached there, Mrs. Mathiesen, Mrs. Capone and other neighbors took the child while a representative of the Times hastened to summon a physician and in a few minutes, Dr. W. M. McGailliard and Dr. J.L. Richard were in attendance. After an examination, they pronounced the injuries to be concussion of the brain and the condition very serious.

Two children of Chief of Police Maher, who were on the platform in front of the bank building where the sulky came in contact and was smashed into pieces, had very narrow escapes.

A child of Mr. F.J. Eikel, the tailor, and one of Mr. M. E. Houlihon, the watchmaker, had most narrow escapes, the horse just grazing them.

Mr. Nic. Eris Sr. also had a fortunate escape, he had barely time to jump from the chair on which he was seated, to the doorway. His chair was struck and broken by the horse. Several other narrow escapes are reported.

After coming in collision with the platform at the bank, the horse stopped and was easily caught.

At a late hour this afternoon, the child was resting easily and there were hopes of its recovery. Mrs. Cary, who had been sick for some time, received a terrible shock, but it is hoped that it will not retard her recovery.

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The bicycle race at Labadieville yesterday attracted about 1,000 persons. Among those who entered from this city were Jos. Maurin, John Nolan and “Landry,” the one-armed rider. The race, which was one mile, was won by “Landry. John Nolan was a close second and M.D. Bringier third. The time was 2 minutes and 54 seconds.

JUNE 2, 1896

dentists

 

Mr. Victor Suarez, a carpenter of this place, while at work this morning on the sugarhouse of McCall Bros. Evan Hall plantation, fell from the roof, breaking an arm and sustaining other injuries.

The distance from which he fell makes his escape from instant death almost miraculous.

He was picked up by the other men employed about the building and removed to one of the dwellings and a doctor at once summoned. In addition to a broken arm one of his ribs is supposed to have been fractured, but it is not thought that he sustained any internal injuries. His broken arm was speedily set and he was said to be resting easily at noon and will probably be removed to his home in Port Barrow this afternoon.

The news of the accident was received with expressions of regret by Mr. Suarez’s numerous friends who all wish him a speedy recovery from his injuries.

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Yesterday near the dividing line of the Melodia and Bush Grove plantations, Lafourche parish, the body of a colored man was found in the water. Along the line, near where the body was found, was a trail of blood, showing that the body had been dragged along it before being thrown into the bayou. Sheriff Beary and other officials are busy investigating the mystery.

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It was rumored about the city today that Adolph Sternfels, who at one time was a clerk in the store of Messrs. B. Lemann & Bro., had been killed in the tornado that swept over St. Louis and vicinity last week. An investigation, however, showed that none of his friends or relations had heard about it and a careful searching of the names of the dead in a Chicago paper made by Messrs. Lemann & Bros. manager Mr. Jacob Blum failed to reveal his name. There was a similar report that Henry Rose had also been killed, but his mother received a dispatch last evening that he was in Cincinnati on that day.

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Little Emmet Cary who was so severely injured by being run over by a runaway horse yesterday is improving and it is now believed that all danger is passed. Dr. T. B. Rider, the family physician, says that the injuries were severe and that the child had a very narrow escape from death. Had the blow, which is now believed to have been from the horse’s knee, been a little higher it would have probably resulted in instant death.

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Photographer Cook of Napoleonville, a nephew of the late Harry Gould, was the guest of Mr. John R. Beal on Sunday.

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Louis Ruffin, colored, who is wanted in St. James parish for shooting and wounding, was arrested at the Illinois Central depot New Orleans yesterday morning by Sheriff-elect L. LeBourgeois. The negro was on the same train with the sheriff, and when they reached New Orleans, the negro was arrested. He was turned over to Capt. John Journee, of the first precinct, who made the proper affidavit against him in the First Recorder’s Court. Ruffin was subsequently arraigned before Recorder Finnegan and was remanded to parish prison to await the action of the St. James authorities.

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Considerable excitement was created in the vicinity of Nicholls avenue and Chetimaches street, about 9 o’clock last evening by a number of pistol shots that came from the yard of John C. Nicholls, the barer. The crowd that assembled began an investigation and found that Nicholls imagined he saw some one in his yard after his chickens and began to use his revolver freely. The crowd that had scented a tragedy breathed easier and quickly dispersed.

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A colored man named George W. Fletcher was shot while attempting to rob a store at La Place, St. John parish, on Sunday evening. He was taken to New Orleans in the custody of Judge La Place and placed in the Charity hospital.

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Widow Gayle, a sister-in-law of Mr. W. G. Wilkinson, who was quite badly hurt by being kicked by a horse in Mr. Wilkinson’s yard about a month ago, is now able to be out for the first time since receiving the injuries.

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Mr. A. D. Vega who will be one of the delegates to the Veteran Encampment at Richmond and the unveiling of the monument at Winchester, will extend his trip further north and will take a well earned vacation.

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Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Aiola are the happy parents of a fine boy, born on Sunday. Mother and child are well.

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The little boy of Mr. and Mrs. A. Gingry was christened at the Catholic church Sunday, receiving the name of Michael Andrew. Mr. H. Schaff was godfather and Miss Edna Cize godmother.

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Clebert Johnson, who was admitted to the pesthouse last week suffering from small pox, is doing well, as is also Buddy McNeil, and both will recover all right from the disease.

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Mrs. Conrad Mayor is at the home of her daughter, Mrs. A. Melancon, on Evan Hall plantation. Her sweet face, with setting of white hair, bears its wonted smile.

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Mr. Manuel Montecino of Evan Hall plantation has recovered sufficiently from his recent severe illness to be about again.

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Mr. and Mrs. J. Frost of Mobile are in the city on a visit to Mrs. Frost’s mother, Mrs. R. Hanson Jr.

JUNE 3, 1896

dentist

Mrs. Thos. Hugh Jones, nee Alice Bourgeois, a native of Ascension, died on Monday evening at Asheville, N. C., where she had gone for her health. The body was brought to New Orleans and from there will be transferred on the evening Valley train to the home of the deceased in St. James parish. Messrs. Fulgence Bourgeois, Fulgence Bourgeois Jr. and J. Achille Landry went from here to New Orleans yesterday to meet the funeral party.

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A terrible tragedy took place at 1 o’clock this morning in one of the dives at Plaquemine that resulted in the killing of Oscar Maillian, the proprietor of the Sazerac saloon, and a man named Charles Riggs, a well known swamper of the town.

Details of the terrible affair as received in this city are rather meagre, but are substantially as follows: Late last night, Maillian went to a disreputable house and while there became involved in a quarrel with Charles Riggs and both men drew their revolvers and began firing at each other. Both received fatal wounds, dying five minutes after.

The place was quite well filled at the time and the greatest excitement prevailed. When the men fell there was a rush made for the doctors, but by the time the latter reached the house both men were dead.

Maillian was well known in this city and has been for years the proprietor of the Sazerac saloon.

The officials of Plaquemine have started an investigation into the matter but it is not believed that any facts beyond those given above will be developed.

A later account says that Maillian was the aggressor in the fight and fired the first shot, when Riggs drew his revolver and both men then fired almost simultaneously with deadly effect.

The Coroner viewed both the bodies this morning and several of the inmates of the dive where the shooting occurred were placed in custody to await the action of the District Attorney in the matter.

A telephone message from Plaquemine says that the tragedy has occasioned a great deal of excitement there and that the stories concerning it are numerous but that the general fact is that it was the result of a nasty quarrel over a woman inmate of the place and that both men were under the influence of liquor.

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Solemn high mass for the repose of the soul of the late Mr. James Teller will be sung at the Catholic church here on Saturday morning next, at 8 o’clock. Relatives and friends of the deceased are invited to be present.

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Mrs. M.C. Morgan, the mother of Mr. W.E. Morgan of Ascension, who for the past year has been in ill health, died on Sunday evening last and was buried in Baton Rouge the next day. Mr. Morgan had been in Baton Rouge attending his mother for about a week.

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Mr. Victor Suarez who was injured by a fall from the roof of the McCall Brothers’ sugarhouse, Evan Hall plantation, passed a restless night, suffering a great deal of pain. Later details of the accident makes his escape from instant death seem almost miraculous. He was engaged in placing the rafters for the iron roof when the support upon which he was standing gave way. As he went down he tried to catch himself by grabbing at two small beams, but his arms went between them, snapping the bone, and letting him drop to the floor which was covered with brick and other debris. Dr. T. H. Hanson was sent for and on examination found that in addition to a broken arm, Mr. Suarez had also sustained a fracture of a hip bone and one of the ribs. These injuries were carefully dressed and the injured man was removed to his home at Port Barrow, by Mr. Tom Cook, who being a brother Knight of Honor, drove with all haste to the plantation as soon as the news of the accident reached him. While Mr. Suarez’s injuries are painful and causes him a great deal of suffering, they are in no wise dangerous and his friends are congratulating him on his escape from instant death. The accident was formally reported to the Knights of Honor at their meeting last evening and Brother Tom Cook was deputized to convey the sympathy of the lodge and such relief as might be needed.

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At 1 o’clock this morning Dr. Theo Webre was awakened by a noise at one of his windows and supposing that it was his son, Samuel, called to that gentleman who answered “all right.” This morning when the house was opened it was found that one of the windows had been broken, but nothing was missed from the house.

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Mr. Jean Bourg, proprietor of the Midway Confectionary, on Railward avenue, and one of the clerks of Mr. M. Netter & Co., is seriously ill with lung trouble. His many friends earnestly hope that his sickness will be of short duration and that he will soon be among them again fully restored to health.

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Mr. G. M. Bowie was reelected Mayor of White Castle on Monday. His election was unanimous, there not being a single vote cast against him. This was a deserved tribute to Mr. Bowie’s public spiritedness and progressive administration of the little city’s affairs.

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Mr. and Mrs. B. Lemann are in New England where they will remain until fall. Mr. Lemann’s health is already showing signs of improvement.

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Miss Celestine Lestrapes has issued cards for an “at home” on tonight.

JUNE 4, 1896

dailytimes

The colored man who was found murdered down the bayou on Monday near the dividing line of Melodia and Bush Grove plantations is now supposed to have been Charles Kane from this city, the description given of the body found tallying with that of Kane who has been missing from here for a couple of weeks.

Kane, who was a brick mason, rented a room from Mr. John Solozano and about two weeks ago he locked it up and told Mr. Solozano that he was going down the bayou in search of work and nothing has been heard from him since. At the time he left here he had some money and was drinking.

Last night two colored men who had come here from Mississippi arrived and began to make inquiries about Kane and when they learned of his disapperance, they expressed a belief, founded on the description of the murdered man, that it was Kane and they will in all probability go to Thibodaux to make a further investigation.

These men said that they had been working with Kane along the coast for some time. He left one day to come to Donaldsonville while they remained on the coast and yesterday they came to see him and for the first time heard of his disappearance and probable murder. Kane was from North Louisiana.

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Marriage Licenses:

  • W. H. Jones to Sarah Watson
  • Ambroise Dobban to Estella Anthony
  • Andrew West to Rebecca Cole
  • Moses Graham to Lizzie Graham
  • T. A. Sibley to Widow Lillie Brown
  • Milton Morris to Flora Jackson
  • Napoleon Hayward to Emily Nicholls

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Capt. Leathers, the octogenarian steamboat man, who was run over by a bicyclist in New Orleans about a week ago, is in serious condition and it is feared his injuries will end fatally.

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Mr. John Medine, a carpenter employed on Messrs. B. Lemann & Bros.’ Palo Alto plantation, was severely crushed about the body yesterday while engaged in unloading a car of lumber at McCall station.

He was assisting at the time in removing a joist 24 feet long, 9 inches wide and 7 inches thick, which in some manner slipped and fell across Mr. Medine’s breast, crushing him quite badly.

Physicians were immediately summoned and Dr. E. K. Sims was the first to reach the scene and at once proceeded to dress the injuries which he found very severe but not necessarily fatal. Dr. J. D. Hanson, the family’s physician, arrived shortly after and the injured man is now under his care.

This morning Mr. Medine was said to be resting easier but was suffering a great deal of pain. A more careful examination made today does not reveal any internal injuries and there is now no doubt expressed over his recovery.

Mr. Medine has been particularly unfortunate of late, not long ago losing one of his eyes by a piece of iron flying into it.

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John Nelson appeared before Justice Maurin today and withdrew the charge he made against Mickey Rodeillat yesterday as being a fugitive from justice.

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Mrs. Wm. Ware and babe, of White Castle, spent Tuesday and yesterday in Donaldsonville as guests of Mrs. Ware’s brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel R. Bowen.

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Miss Celestine Lastrapes gave a delightful Lotto party at her residence last evening, in compliment to the teachers of the public schools of this parish. In addition to the teachers, there were present a few of Miss Lastrapes’ personal friends. The first prize, a handsome tea pot, was won by Miss Florence Thompson, and the consolation prize, a little fancy whip, by Miss Ida Turner. Among the other teachers who participated were Miss Mamie Armitage, Miss Mattie Saxon and Miss Bertha Carmouche. The affair throughout was most delightful and every one departed with most pleasant memories of the charming hostess.

JUNE 5, 1896

coolest

Mr. D. Ohlmeyer returned last night from a day’s stay in New Orleans.

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Capt. T. K. Voorhies of the Comeaux line has gone to his home in St. Louis for a few weeks rest.

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Capt. F. M. Andrews, a well known steamboat man, is dangerously ill.

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One of the most delightful affairs of the season was the fishing party which took place at Bayou Corne last Monday. All speak enthusiastically of the pleasant day spent. Miss H. Bowers received the prize for being the first to draw a fish out of the water. The following were present: Mrs. A. H. Foley, Mrs. F. Foley, Misses Armstrong and Rodgers, Mrs. Schufelt, Mrs. Carroll Barton and the Messrs. A. H. Foley, Lawrence and Edward Pugh, E. W. Pike, Adolph Minuet, Albert Folse and M. Foote.

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Mr. Frank Messina of this city was married yesterday to Miss Olive Carze of Lutcher, the ceremony taking place at the home of the bride. The newly married couple arrived in this city last evening and are stopping at the home of Mr. Messina’s family.

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Mr. Joe Keating, an old resident of this city, but for the past 10 years domiciled at Plaquemine has once more returned to his old love and is now comfortably settled in his new home at the corner of Nicholls avenue and Lafourche street, in the house formerly occupied by Mr. J. H. Ayraud Jr. Mr. Keating is the manager of the Wilbert Sons Ascension Lumber yard in this city, and his return is very gratifying to his host of friends who are congratulating him on being back once more in our live city after such a long hibernation in a slow town like Plaquemine.

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There was a collision this morning at the corner of Iberville and Lessard streets between the ice wagon driven by Dominique Casso and the milk cart of Mr. Thomas Blouin. The cart was upset and Mr. Blouin and his colored boy attendant were thrown out and the milk spilled. Neither Mr. Blouin nor the boy, fortunately, received any injuries, outside of a bath of milk.

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The solemn high mass for the repose of the soul of the late James Teller which was to have been sung at the Catholic church tomorrow morning has been postponed until some later day on account of tomorrow being within an octave of the feast of Corpus Christi, in which time the church cannot be decorated in black or any vestments of that color used.

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There has been considerable moving done by residents during the past week. Among those who have set up their household god in new temples are: Prof. Montamat who has been removed from Railroad avenue to Nicholls avenue. Mr. Schaff who has moved further up Mississippi street, and Alcee Rodrigue who is now domiciled on Railroad avenue, near the depot.

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Mr. John Medine, who was so badly injured by a piece of timber falling on him at McCall station, as reported in yesterday’s paper, is resting easier today and there is no doubt about his recovery.

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The bicycle that was raffled off by Messrs. B. Lemann & Bro. today was won by Mr. Edgar Fortier, the bookkeeper at the ice factory.

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Mr. Theophile Fernandez, the venerable father of Deputy Clerk J. F. Fernandez, has returned from New Orleans to which city he had gone to have an operation performed upon his eyes.

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Miss A. Hemindiger, who has been the guest of Mr. and Mrs. L. Maas, left for her home in Plaquemine today.

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Prof. A. J. Montamat‘s “Sidonius Waltz” is on sale at the jewelry store at A. G. Wutke & Co. Price, 40 cents.

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Miss L. Schuster of Hohen Solms spent today in our city with her friend, Miss Florence Maas.

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Mr. Stark L. Davis, the genial manager of Souvenir plantation, was in the city this morning.

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The young wife of Mr. Louis Oorde of Napoleonville was buried at Plattenville yesterday.

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Mr. Laz. Meyer returned from Baton Rouge today after a visit of a couple of days.

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Mr. William Tearney of Evan Hall plantation was a visitor to our city today.

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Mr. Henry Meyer of Hayes Station, Miss., spent Monday in the city with friends.

JUNE 8, 1896

citydirectory

Frank Brady, a former steamboat mate, who has been well known on the river, committed suicide last week in St. Louis, because of being haunted by the memory of a man whom he killed in 1892. The man he killed was Mate Jake McCarthy.

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President Andrews of the Yazoo and Tallahatchie line who has been very ill for the past two weeks is reported to be convalescent according to news received by a friend in New Orleans.

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Mr. Jasmin Feitel was a visitor to Donaldsonville Sunday.

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The many friends of Mr. Taylor Bergeron are pleased to seem him out again after a brief illness.

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Mr. Morris Levy of Elm Hall store, accompanied by the charming Misses Bella and Ida Weill of Napoleonville, left for Baton Rouge Monday to attend the Farnbacher-Blumenstein wedding. Mr. Levy, as usual, looked well on duty as usher. They returned Wednesday evening and speak highly of their trip.

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Mrs. Langbecker‘s and her daughter, Miss Anna, left for New Orleans yesterday afternoon and took the steamer Louisiana from that city today for Liverpool. On arriving in the latter city, they will proceed direct to London and after spending a couple of weeks in London will go to Germany where they will remain all summer. This is Mrs. Langbecker’s third trip abroad.

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Mrs. Benjamin Holzman accompanied by her pretty daughter, Miss Hortense, arrived in the city this morning and will remain here a few days as the guest of her sister Mrs. J. Blum. Accompanied by Mrs. Blum, Mrs. Holzman will make a short trip to New Orleans to meet her eldest daughter, Miss Sadie, who is returning from the Young Woman’s College of Baltimore.

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Justice Edmund Maurin this morning laid down the reins of office to his successor, Justice Israel. Judge Maurin during his incumbency of the office made a first class official. He was always attentive to business, suave and polite to all with whom he came in contact and there were many regrets over his retirement. Mr. Maurin has established a law, notarial and collection office and there is no doubt but that he will prove eminently successful in this new venture, for which he is so well qualified by legal knowledge and personal attributes.

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Mrs. Catherine Marchand, wife of Mr. Alex Marchand, a well known sugar planter of this parish, died at her home on Willow Grove plantation at 10 o’clock Saturday evening aged 70 years from heart disease from which she had been suffering for several months. The funeral took place at the Catholic church in this city at 8:30 this morning and was largely attended. The interment was in the Catholic cemetery.

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Constable George Goetz went back into private life on Saturday, when his successor qualified. George made a capital officer and was at all times efficient and obliging.

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Mr. Jean Bourg whose illness on Saturday threatened a serious turn we are pleased to announce is very much better today.

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An Italian employed on the McCall plantation was kicked by a mule on Saturday and rendered senseless for some time.

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Miss Ella Bentley, who has been at a convent in New Orleans, will be home on the 26th inst.

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Misses Coralie and Florence Levy will leave next month to spend the summer in the north.

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Miss Jessie Price will spend several weeks in Indiana visiting relatives.

JUNE 9, 1896

excursion

Capt. T. P. Feathers has been pronounced out of danger. The Captain had a very close call.

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According to the New Orleans Times-Democrat there is in the University ground at Baton Rouge a peculiar looking object that attracts much attention from spectators and many inquiries as to what it is. This object according to Col. Nicholson is nothing else than the original kettle in which Etienne de Bore first succeeded in granulating the sugar cane juice and making the first sugar that was ever made in Louisiana from cane. Col. Nicholson said he had picked it up accidentally in a little foundry down in Donaldsonville. The foundryman told its history and gave it to him, and he put it on the university grounds as a fitting souvenir of a great accomplishment in the agricultural world so that it might be preserved.

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Mr. and Mrs. Henry Buquol are entertaining a little girl visitor who arrived at their house on Saturday evening.

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Mr. John Dencause of Galvez this parish was a visitor to the city today.

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There are now 11 prisoners in the jail under the tender care of Jailer Acosta.

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Mayor Leche is out of the city having accompanied the excursion of the Independent Brass and Reed Band.

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Miss C. Dufilch, who has been a guest of Miss M. Blanchy, left this morning for New River to visit the latter’s sister, Mrs. C. D. Gondran.

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A little boy stranger put in an appearance at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Gentil last evening. It will doubt be well bread and become the flour of the flock.

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Widow A. B. Sharp took the train yesterday for New Orleans to see her grand daughter who soon leaves that city for Illinois on a visit for the summer.

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Miss Parmella Treille, the youngest daughter of Lieut. Hubert Treille, has been quite ill for the past few days, but we are pleased to say is now speedily recovering.

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Justice Lenares had his first case this morning when Rose Brooks and Harriette Tate were brought up before him on a charge of disturbing the pace. The evidence was “dead agin em” and the Judge assessed the damage to the peace and good name of the city at $2.50 each.

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Braud Strong was arraigned before Justice Israel this morning on a charge of petit larceny. He was held in $20 bonds to answer at the next term of the district court.

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Mary Smith said to be insane was removed to the parish prison for examination into her sanity.

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Mr. A. D. Vega is in New Orleans today on a business trip.

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The Independent Brass and Reed Band started this morning on their excursion down the bayou on the steamer Lafourche. Among the ladies that accompanied the party were Misses Irene and Ella Landry, Stella and Emma Richard, Stella and Aline Vega and Mrs. Paul Leche and little son. The excursionists will return some time tomorrow evening.

JUNE 10, 1896

groceries

 

Our young and energetic friend, Morris Kahn, is once more able to be out again after a two weeks’ tussle with bilious fever.

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Messrs. Harry Allemand and E. Bertaut of Lauderdale came into the city last evening with brand new bugles and prancing steeds with the intention of giving two of our young ladies a drive. One succeeded in his mission while the other drove home alone as the lady sought was away on the excursion of the Independent Brass and Reed Band.

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Handsome Sam. LeBlanc of White Castle was in our city today.

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Miss Edna Hebert of Plaquemine has been spending a few pleasant days in this city.

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We regret to announce the death of Frances Alolu, the infant daughter of Joseph Alolu and Lizzie Messina, yesterday afternoon. The funeral took place this afternoon at 4 o’clock at the Catholic church.

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Mr. D. Gentil, superintendent of the waterworks, is engaged today in cleaning out the water tower. The deposit of mud and other refuse in the tower the past month has been very heavy and the work of cleaning it away is entailing considerable labor.

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It was a rather quiet day for Justice Lenares only two cases coming up before his honor, those being two colored damsels, Harriette Murray and Martha Anderson who had been arrested for fighting and disturbing the peace. The evidence against them was conclusive and they were fined two dollars each for their little scrap last night.

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Joe Cambarell, a well known young Italian residing on Railroad avenue, is missing and so is a young and beautiful Italian woman, Josie Connatello, to whom Joe has been paying his attentions for some time past. It seems that the young man was very anxious to marry but his aspirations in that direction were opposed by his father. The young people, however, seem to have taken the matter in their own hands and settled the question by an elopement. While there (sic) whereabouts are unknown, they are supposed to have gone to New Orleans. It is understood if the young couple return, they will be forgiven and given a parental blessing.

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Somewhat of an excitement was created on Railroad avenue in the rear of the Racket store yesterday evening by a pistol shot said to have been fired at a little Italian boy named Joe Mouro. The boy declared that the shot was fired by Mr. R. Henderson, the proprietor of the Racket store.

Officer William Thomas placed Mr. Henderson under arrest and then paroled him to appear before the Mayor this morning. As Mayor Leche is out of the city all the parties today appeared before Alderman H. O. Maher who is acting as Mayor pro-tem, but that gentleman decided he had no jurisdiction and sent the complainant to Justice Israel. The latter when seen this afternoon said that he understood that the boy’s mother intended swearing out a warrant, but up to that time she had not yet done so.

Mr. Henderson when seen this morning denied all knowledge of the shooting and said that he had positively not fired any shot at the boy. He heard the shot fired and it was in the yard back of his store. He said he knew the boy well and that he had stolen from his store but he knew nothing about his being in the yard yesterday. Officer Thomas had called on him and told him what the mother and the boy said and had advised him to go and see the Mayor, which he did but found that the Mayor was out of town. That was positively all he knew of the matter.

JUNE 11, 1896

sweets

The veteran steamboatman Capt. T. P. Leathers was reported last night to be dying, and the end was expected momentarily.

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At noon today it was suggested that a mass meeting be held at the courthouse to go in search of his honor, the Mayor, and the other distinguished gentlemen on the steamer Lafourche who had not been heard of since the boat entered the tempestuous waters of Bayou Lafourche early Tuesday morning. Editor Bentley volunteered to pilot any party that might be formed to rescue the unhappy excursionists who were supposed to be wrecked on some barren land at the mercy of the mosquitoes. Some skeptics laughed at the idea of the steamer being wrecked and said that the excursion was only a disguised Cuban fiibustering expedition that had been gotten up by the Mayor who was an earnest champion of Cuban liberty, and it was now probably well on its way to Cuban shores.

This was repudiated by friends of the touring musicians as a bass viol calumny tuba denounced as “all in a born.” While this discussion was going on fears of the party starving were expressed when Sidney Vega asked “Isn’t Billy Terrio aboard? Well, that settles it, the steamer will not be heard from then until all the food on board is gone. There will be no starving where Billy is.”

“I don’t apprehend any serious danger to the party,” said Mr. Chas. Maurin, “but as August Heine is along there is a probability of their having a close shave.”

Capt. Ed. Maurin wanted to get out a cannon and fire minute salutes to guide the steamer if she was off her course. Suggestions of all kinds were now coming in thick and fast.In fact everything was coming but the steamer and just as the relief party were about to charter the ferry boat, the snake boat, Cole’s boat and other boats to form a flotella when the whistle of the Lafourche was heard and a shout of joy went up as it was now certain that the wanderers were safe. A rush was made to the wharf and a few minutes later the excursionists landed and were welcomed home with outstretched arms.

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It is with deepest regret that we record the death of Mr. John Bourg who passed away at 4:30 this morning, from cancer of the liver in the 50th year of his age. The deceased was a part owner of the Midway Confectionary on Railroad avenue and in addition was a clerk at M. Netter & Co’s and was one of the most popular and highly respected citizens of the city and his death is generally mourned by a large circle of friends. Deceased leaves a widow nee Josephine LeBlanc, and one daughter, Miss Edna, to whom, in common with others, the Times extends its condolences in this their hour of deepest sorry. The funeral takes place this afternoon at 6 o’clock from the Catholic church.

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May and Sam Jackson, who were out last night for a good time, had their careers cut short by being arrested for disturbing the peace. Both were up before Judge Israel this morning and were ordered to provide a peace bond in the sum of $50.

Olivia Tuppen, who was charged with a similar offense, was placed under a similar bond.

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Mrs. Miller, an aged lady residing on Germania plantation, slipped and fell from the steps of her residence on Saturday and broke her left arm. She was attended by Dr. T. B. Rider. Mrs. Miller’s accident was occasioned by the fact that she is nearly blind.

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Two young men who claimed to have walked from New Orleans here on a wager and were on their way from here to Plaquemine passed through the city last evening. They gave their names as Henry Geist and Fred. Doeble and looked pretty well worn and travel stained when they reached here.

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Joseph Carter, a colored boy, aged 10 years, better known as Joe Bradley, was drowned about 1 o’clock this afternoon while swimming near the ferry landing and from an account obtained by the Times representative two big colored boys who were with him at the time are responsible for his death.

It seems the three were together in shallow water when one of the big boys threw little Joe out into the deep water to see if he could swim and being unable to do so he quickly sank.

The two big boys became scared and scampered off never attempting to save their victim and up to three o’clock this afternoon they had not been apprehended.

Some men began at once to search for the body and among them was Arthur Fernandez. The latter made a dive and came up under a flatboat from which he was drawn out in an unconscious condition by Davey LeBlanc. He was at once taken to his home and Drs. Thibaut and Sims summoned but it is feared that he will not recovery.

The search for the body of the drowned boy was kept up and at 3:30 this afternoon it was recovered and taken to his home.

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Joe. Camborello and Josie Carnotello, an account of whose elopement was published yesterday returned to the city last evening, but unmarried, they having decided that it would be better to have the matrimonial knot tied here. They at once repaired to the office of Judge Israel, who performed the ceremony in a most artistic manner. For fear that the parents might attempt to make matters unpleasant for the young couple, officer McCray visited the former and warned them not to molest the young people or they would get into trouble and under the beneficent protection of the constabulary the newly wedded couple are now launched on the treacherous sea of matrimony.

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Mr. Felix Dugas of Westfield was a visitor to our city today.

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Mr. Felix Rodrigue and family of Hohen Solms were visitors to our city today.

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Mr. C. L. Triche assumed formal charge of the Sheriff’s office of Assumption parish yesterday.

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Alderman Forcha who has been keeping bachelor’s hall for the past month expects his family back again next week.

JUNE 12, 1896

steamlaundry

It was an ideally congenial party, composing the Independent Brass and Reed Band’s annual excursion, that boarded the handsome steamer Lafourche early on Tuesday morning. The party was welcomed as they stepped on the steamer’s deck by its commander, Capt. P. A. Charlet, one of nature’s noblemen, who gave each of the excursionists a hearty handshake and then metaphorically turned the steamer and all its hands over to the command of the party with the statement that while they were his guests the steamer and all its resources were at their disposal and their wish should be a law.

From that time until the excursionists arrived home yesterday evening, pleasure was unconfined and joy and merriment reigned supreme. As the steamer moved slowly down the bayou, the excursionists began to settle themselves and put in order the state rooms that had been assigned them and when this was done the steamer was inspected from stern to bow, the party being accompanied by the Captain and others in his employ, who explained all the workings of the machinery, the latter of which were peculiarly interesting to the young ladies, several of whom became the Captain’s special guests in the pilot house.

After taking breakfast which showed the marvelous resources of the culinary department, the excursionists gathered on the shady side of the steamer and whiled away the time listening to the music of the band and watching the roustabouts as they loaded and unloaded the freight at various landings.

At 6 o’clock the steamer reached Elm Hall and the tourists were informed by Purser Nicolle that he would remain there for a couple of hours and if anyone wished to go ashore they would have an opportunity to do so. This was taken advantage of by the entire party to visit Napoleonville, a short walk from the landing. The little town was thoroughly inspected and the a visit paid to the pretty new courthouse through which the party was shown by the janitor. Shortly before 7 o’clock all were back on the steamer again and remained on deck engaged in singing and other amusements until near 11 o’clock when all retired for the night. During the morning Captain Charlet informed Mayor Leche that when the boat reached Plattenville that he should leave it for a visit to his home, until the boat’s return from Lockport, but while he was away he desired the Mayor to consider himself the commander of the steamer and he would find that all of his commands and wishes would be complied with.

The party was up at an early hour Wednesday morning and just as breakfast was finished the steamer reached Thibodaux and all went on shore for a couple of hours. The first place visited was the Empire Hotel of which Mr. J. E. Moseman is the proprietor, and that genial gentleman took particular pleasure in showing the party over his handsome and well managed house. Mr. Moseman extended to the entire party refreshments after which some of the crowd wended their way to the Catholic church while others strolled about the city until their leave of absence had expired when there was a hasty return to the boat which proceeded leisurely on to Lockport. But a short stop was made at the latter place and the steamer safely began her upward trip. On reaching Plattenville several of the young ladies got off and proceeded to Capt. Charlet’s residence and escorted him back in state to the steamer. After supper on Wednesday evening, the tables were reset a couple of hours later and ice cream and cakes were served by Capt. Charlet as a special compliment to his guests. Following this came music on the piano during which there was some promiscuous dancing enjoyed by the young ladies. It was a late hour that evening before all had retired for their last night’s sleep upon the boat.

On Thursday as the boat passed the convict camp near Paincourtville, there was a burial going on. There had been three graves dug and a body enclosed in a rough plank box was being lowered in one of these just as the steamer passed by. A count of the graves showed 21 had already been buried on the levee and it was said by Purser Nicolle that there were many sick in the hospital of which the excursionists caught a good view.

The steamer was now fast approaching Donaldsonville, and the regrets were general that the pleasures of the past two days would soon be a memory only. Capt. Charlet was now corralled by the young ladies and each and every one took him by the hand and thanked him personally, and through him every one of the employees for the many kindnesses and courtesies that had been shown the party and assured him that it would ever live as one of the most delightful events in their lives.

When the steamer was finally made fast to the wharf, three cheers were given for the handsome steamer, her royal commander and all employed on her.

The ladies and gentlemen who composed the excursion were: Mrs. Paul Leche, little Carl Leche, Misses Stella and Emma Richard, Misses Stella and Aline Vega, Misses Irene and Ella Landry, Miss Edwige Choppin, Miss Octavie Terrio and Miss A. Cire. The members of the band were: Paul Leche, J. F. Terrio, Jas. Fortier, Paul Braud, Fred. Landry, Felix Fortier, Aug. Heine, Henry Terrio, D. Ohlmeyer, Wm. A. Terrio.

The ladies of the party wish the Times to extend to Billy Terrio their thanks for the pleasant treat he so generously tendered them.

The excursionists wish to make public their thanks to the following officials of the steamer whow extended every effort and made their trip so delightful.

P. A. Charlet, captain; Edward Nicolle, purser; Simon Pintado and Paul Dominique, mates: P. J. Charlet and Felix Bergeron, freight clerks; A. N. Pintado and Seraphin Himel, pilots; Thos. Ruiz and A. S. Himel, engineers; Joe Pujol, druggist; Alphonse Ledoux, steward.

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It was quite a busy day for Judge Lenares today. The first offender up was Rosa Brooks, a colored damsel of free and easy tendencies who had been run down in the tenderloin district for disturbing the peace. Rosa was ordered to furnish bonds in the sum of $20 to keep the peace.

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Theodore Davis and Si Green, jealous of the reputation gained by Barber Nicholls and Sidney Montero in their prize fight, tried to emulate these men but were arrested while the flight was in progress and it will cost them just $2 a piece for their notoriety.

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Isaac Bell likes to pose as a bad, bad man and he started out last night to run the city. His career was short and this morning he had to pay a fine of $2.50 and furnish a peace bond of $25. This ended the day’s performance in his honor’s court.

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The drowining of the little colored boy yesterday should act as a warning to the crowd of boys that go into the river to bathe ever evening, most of whom are entirely too young to be allowed to do so. When in the water they throw ordinary prudence to the wind and become reckless. The season of accidental drownings is now fairly opened and parents cannot be too careful in making the river a forbidden place for their young boys.

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Mrs. John Forcha and her two little children Robert and John returned home yesterday from Centerrville, Miss. after a month’s stay there with Mrs. Forcha’s parents. Mrs. Forcha was accompanied by her sister, Miss Mamie Riggs, a most charming and accomplished society belle of that town.

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Arthur Fernandez, who was thought to have been fatally injured while diving for the body of the boy, Bradley, who was drowned yesterday, is much improved today and will in all probability recover.

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Mr. Theodore Myer of Bayou Sara was married on Wednesday to Miss Glass of Shreveport, the wedding taking place at the latter city. Messrs. L. Meyer of Donaldsonville and Myrtille Meyer of Klotzville, brothers of the groom, attended the wedding.

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Miss Tinette Pugh, the accomplished third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.N. Pugh, who has been attending to her studies at Blake’s High School, New Orleans, is at the home of her parents for the vacation period. Miss Pugh’s many friends extend her a hearty welcome home.

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The funeral of the late John Bourg took place at the Catholic church last evening and was very largely attended. The employee of Messrs. M. Netter & Co., in whose employ the deceased was a clerk, attended in a body. The pall bearers were Messrs Paul LeBlanc, Armand Bordier, Jules Bordier, Tony LeBlanc, Henry Robinson and young Bourg, the latter a nephew of the deceased. The floral tributes were many and beautiful.

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The energetic young gentleman Mr. Nestor Hebert, until recently in the employ of Messrs. R. and L. Levy’s mammoth store at Paincourtville, recently resigned this position to accept the agency of the Singer Sewing Machine Co. for St. James parish, vice Mr. Monroe C. Thompson resigned. Mr. Hebert took charge of his new place last Monday and says that he is well satisfied with his new business venture. We earnestly and cheerfully commend Mr. Hebert to the firm he represents and to the St. James public as being a courteous, honest, upright and true young gentleman. We wish him much success.

JUNE 15, 1896

star

George Ward Jr., who is making a trip around the world in a one-horse buggy, is expected to arrive in this city some time tomorrow on his way to New Orleans. He left Ogden, Utah, on the 13th of Jan. last and must, according to the wager, be back at his starting point on Sept. 13, 1898. On arriving at New Orleans, Mr. Ward will take a steamer for Europe and will drive over the old world striking Asia at Palestine. The hard part is, that he is compelled by the terms of the wager, to leave Ogden without a cent of money and all his expenses and living must be made on the trip. He has so far done very well financially by selling his photographs and taking subscriptions for a sporting journal to which he sends letters about his trip. The sensational part of the matter is, that before Mr. Ward wins the wager, he must marry a lady worth at least $2,000 in her own right, and must we before he returns to Ogden to claim the wager.

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Phoenix Opera House patrons have seen many clever amateur actresses, but about the cleverest of all of them is Miss Willie Lou Bessonet, the accomplished, beautiful and entertaining young lady who assumed the role of Lelia Hawkins in the “Squire’s Daughter” last night. The Paincourtville Dramatic Club is proud to have Miss Bessonet enrolled upon its list of membership. May this gifted young principal of the Belle Rose public school attain a place in the highest rank of educators is the earnest wish of the Times.

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Every day, and particularly after high mass at the Catholic church on Sundays, a crowd of boys make it a practice to assemble at the old Braud saw mill in Faubourg LaPipe and divest themselves of every raiment and go in swimming. So disgraceful has this become that the residents have applied to the authorities to put an end to it, but as yet it has not been stopped. A few arrests and fines would soon break this practice up.

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There was only one marriage license issued last week and that was to the Italian elopers.

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Mr. E. T. Dugas, the leading man of the Paincourtville Amateur Dramatic Club, is an actor of rare merit and there was very little about his work at the opera house last night to suggest the amateur. He was easy, natural, graceful, forceful and finished and it looks that while the medical profession had secured in him a valued recruit, the stage at the same time had lost a notable artist.

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Mr. L. A. Flaudry, formerly one of Netter & Co.’s leading salesmen, but now fulfilling a similar position in the Armelise store of Dugas & LeBlanc in Assumption parish, was in our city yesterday and we had the pleasure of shaking the hand of our genial friend. Flaudry is as good looking and dudified as ever.

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That esteemed gentleman and pioneer settler of New River, Mr. Solomon Barman, father of Mr. James S. Barman, the popular and bustling insurance agent of this city, visited Donaldsonville yesterday. He will remain until tomorrow when he leaves for St. Mary parish to be present at the marriage of his son, R. S. Barman, which happy event takes place on Wednesday.

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Miss M. Blanchy, accompanied by Miss Mary Gregg, the latter the charming young graduate of the St. Vincent’s Institute, were visitors to Mrs. Jos. Gondran of New River lane last week. On their return to this city they were joined by Miss C. Dufilho of New Orleans.

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Miss Delia Hughes, a sister of Mrs. P. Beddington, spent yesterday in our city.

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The funeral of Capt. T. P. Leathers, the oldest boatman on the river, whose death was caused by being run down by a bicycle rider in New Orleans, took place today. The steamers on the river had their flags at half mast.

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Ex-Representative O. A. Bullion was in attendance at the meeting of the Democratic executive committee on Saturday. Mr. Bullion is still limping from the effect of a kick he received from his horse a couple of weeks ago.

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M. D. Bringier, Dick Godbery, J. T. Nolan Jr. and Warren Guyal, the one-armed rider, were all entered in the bicycle races in New Orleans on Saturday night. Bringier was the only one to get a place, he coming in third in the one mile race. In the trial heat of the one mile race the riders had quite a bad fall. Just as the men had finished the three quarters Bringier, Nolan and Van Cleve, coming from off the banking of the turns, ran entirely too close to the infield. Bringer’s wheel was the first to leave the track and the other two followed. Then there was a tumble and all the riders went rolling over one another. There were no injuries and they mounted their wheels at once and raced after Rollins and Soards. The men did not hope to win, but there was a fight for the third place, which would give them a chance to qualify. Their courage won many friends in the grand stand, and when the three riders finished, there was a general round of applause. Bringier got third place and thus qualified to enter in the final heat.

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One of the most enjoyable social functions of the season was a charming idea of Miss Mattie E. Pugh, who gave a hay ride party on Saturday evening, in honor of her guest Miss Narcisa Johnson. Three large plantation wagons well filled with hay were supplied by Mr. Willie Hanson and all of them were well filled with one of the jolliest parties of the season. The ride was a most delightful one and on the return of the guests to Mr. Pugh‘s residence dancing was indulged in until a late hour. The party which was chaperoned by Mrs. W. Hanson was composed of the following ladies and gentlemen: Misses Mattie E. Pugh, Tinette Pugh, Albertha and Jennie McGailliard, Marie Richard, Jeanne Poche, Emma Nolan, Alice Kline and Messrs. Jos. Maurin, Wallace Barron, Sidney Vega, Dr. E. K. Sims, Albert Martin, Eddie Hanson, H. Comstock, Leon Levi, Browse Bringier and Norman Prescott.

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Mr. John Solozano decided the he would run over to Burnside on Saturday and show the cracks of the famous gun club there what good shooting was. John ran up against al the experts of the club, including the hitherto invincible Palmer and downed them all. John is now determined to organize a gun club in this city and will not rest until such a consummation is secured. Mr. Solozano was delighted with the treatment he received from the gentlemen at Burnside who treated him royally.

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Andrew Gingry Jr., whose business card appears in The Times today, has been turning out some meritorious work of late in the way of balusters, fancy scroll work and cisterns. In the construction of the latter, he is without a rival and his prices are always the lowest. Those who need anything in his line will consult their interest by having a talk with Mr. Gingry before giving out their contracts.

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Arthur Fernandez who had a close call with death Thursday last by hitting his head against a flat boat when diving for the body of the drowned negro boy is around again all right.

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Mrs. J. A. Braud has commenced collecting among gentlemen and begs to be favorably received. She has named the following persons to collect from colored people: Mesdames Vileor Dupart, Marie LeBlanc, Joseph Duffel.

JUNE 16, 1896

shoes

There are three cases of small pox in a house on Tailor street, all of the afflicted being colored women. The first of these is an imported case the woman having come from Churchville.

Dr. Thibaut, the city physician, this morning said that he would probably have them all removed to the pest house during the day but could not say definitely until he had had an interview with the Mayor.

“There are two inmates now at the pest house that could have been discharged a week ago, but I shall not let them out now until next Friday,” said Dr. Thibaut. “You can say” continued the doctor that there is nothing to alarm anyone on account of these new cases as they are thoroughly isolated and but small danger of contagion.

The woman who came from Churchville is said to have had the disease when she reached this city but was kept secluded by her friends.

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Mr. Jos. V. St. Martin, the worthy son of our Sheriff, has been spending a week at his home in Faubourg LaPipe. He will return to New Orleans and resume his dental studies today.

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Mrs. John Williams is spending today with Mrs. Milton Sanchez of the Halfway plantation.

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Miss L. Harp, the pretty eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John P. Harp, gave us an appreciated call this afternoon.

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Mrs. Bachemin and daughter and Mrs. Mazorie of New Orleans are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Sanchez of Halfway plantation.

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Jailor Acosta reported everything quiet at the parish prison this morning. His boarders are in good health and their appetites the best. While his menu does not include ice cream and watermelons, his boarders are entirely satisfied with it. The Jail is as clean as a whistle and Mr. Acosta has reason to feel proud of its condition.

JUNE 17, 1896

sheriffssale

Yesterday afternoon a colored man named Bowman, residing just above Port Barrow, became enraged at his daughter, Lillie, aged 17 years, because she had no dinner ready for him when he came in and beat her in a brutal and shameful manner with a piece of rope.

Another daughter who was present at the time ran from the house and came over to this city in search of her mother who was working here. The mother at once left for her home and found that her daughter was badly bruised and suffering greatly from the beating the brutal father had inflicted.

It seems that when Bowman went off to workin the morning, the young woman had fixed him up a big lunch and had not expected him to return for dinner and in consequence made no preparations for that meal.

When he came in and asked why the dinner was not read, she told him of the lunch she had given him. For some reason, this enraged him and he picked up a piece of rope and assaulted her.

The young woman is said to be quite badly hurt, but her injuries are not of a serious character. Up to noon today no complaint had been made against Bowman and he had not been arrested.

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Misses Albertha and Jennie McGalliard, daughters of Dr. W. M. McGailliard, have returned from attending school in New Orleans. Miss Albertha was one of this year’s class of the Blake High School, graduating with distinguished honors. Miss Jennie, who will graduate next year, received the first prize for music. These talented and popular young ladies have been receiving a great deal of social attention since their return home.

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There were a score of young urchins swimming in the river last evening. Unless more care is exercised there will be a number of accidental drownings before the season is over.

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A most delightful wagon ride and dance was given by the young ladies of this city last evening in honor of Misses Sadie and Hortense Holzman of Shreveport, the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Blum and Miss Narcissa Johnson of New Orleans, the guest of Misses Mattie and Tinette Pugh. After a most enjoyable ride the party arrived at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. M. Goldstein on B. Lemann & Bro’s Perseverance plantation and found the house and grounds beautifully illuminated with Chinese lanterns and otherwise decorated, presenting a veritable scene from Fairyland. Dancing at once began and was kept up until 3 o’clock this morning when the party, very tired, but highly delighted and very enthusiastic returned to their homes in this city. During the evening, the young ladies who had the management of the party were agreeably surprised and very much pleased by being presented with three mammoth and handsome cakes, the gifts of Mesdames M. Goldstein, M. Kern and R. Singer. These ladies in other ways did much to add to the success of the affair and our young ladies desire to make their acknowledgement and thanks for all those timely courtesies. During the intermission between the dances, the guests were favored with some piano selections by the Misses Holzman. The party was chaperoned by Mrs. Jacob Blum and Mrs. Holzman and the conveyance was furnished by Mr. J. Elphege LeBlanc, the manager of the Belle Terre plantation. The party was composed of the following: Misses Sadie and Hortense Holzman, Narcissa Johnson, Stella Vega, Loulie Israel, Alice Kline, Jeanne Poche, Lelia Pike, Eloise Esneault, Malvina Esneault, Emma Weber, Laura Comeaux, Stella Richard, Marie Richard, A. Vessier, and Messrs. Walter, Henry and Ned Comstock, Sidney Vega, M. D. and Browse Bringier, Paul and Auguste Braud, Euclid Richard, H. Treille Jr., J. Jos. Park, Leon Levi, Randolph Feltus, Henry Esneault, Richard Godbery, Wallace Barron, Caleb Weber, Frank and Linden Sharp, Frank and Dr. E. K. Sims, August Heine, Jos. Babin and Albert Duffel.

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Capt. William Campbell resumed command of the steamer Paul Tulane today, after a week’s absence from the boat on account of illness.

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Miss Jeanne Poche and her sister-in-law, Mrs. Geo. Poche, left this morning for St. James parish to visit the family of Willie Poche. They will be gone a few days.

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Mr. F. H. Larose, the estimable son-in-law of Mr. John Solozano, is laid up at his father-in-law’s home with chills and fever. We hope to mention his early recovery.

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A pleasant fishing party composed of Misses Bertha, Lise and Noemie Mollere and Messrs. Max Dupaty and John Gaudin, returned from Bayou Corne on Monday evening.

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Master Caleb Weber, a popular and promising young student at Dyer’s School, New Orleans, returned home yesterday afternoon to remain with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Weber, until the next session of the school. His numerous friends here have given him a hearty welcome home.

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Our handsome young friend, Master Ned Maher, son of our competent and obliging Deputy Sheriff H. O. Maher, returned home last Saturday from the Chamberlain Hunt Academy at Port Gibson, Miss., to spend the vacation with his parents. Ned is a bright boy and is making rapid progress in his studies.

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It is with deep regret that we announce today the death of Mr. W. W. Pugh, the father of Mr. Edward N. Pugh of this city, at his home near Napoleonville, Assumption parish, last evening. Deceased was one of the oldest and most respected residents of Assumption which he had honored with his citizenship for many years. The news of Mr. Pugh’s death was received everywhere with tender evidences of regret.

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An informal but nevertheless a most enjoyable sewing party was given at the residence of Capt. John T. Nolan on the St. Elizabeth plantation last evening by a few of Donaldsonville’s prettiest belles who have enrolled themselves into a club known as the “Sweet Seven,” in compliment to he young men who have a similar organization known as the “Sour Seven.” The gentleman’s first prize was won by Mr. L. A. Becnel, the second by Mr. Joseph Maurin and the third by Mr. H. McCall Jr. A pretty piece of work by one of the young ladies was a picture of one of our society swells that had been embroidered on pink satin with red silk. The likeness was admirable, being rue to every feature in detail and easily recognized.

JUNE 18, 1896

peoplescolumn

The announcement yesterday of the death of Mr. W. W. Pugh was erroneous and came through information furnished the Times that we had every reason to believe was reliable, our informants having given us the name of Mr. Pugh’s father instead of Mrs. Pugh‘s father, as it was the latter, Mr. Howell, who died in New Orleans.

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Miss Emma Barrilleaux, a most prepossessing young lady from Lockport, after spending a few days with the beautiful daughters of Lieut. Hubert Treille, Misses Carmelite and Parmella Treille of Port Barrow, left on the forenoon train today for White Castle, where she visit her sister.

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Masters Willie Bradford and Ned Leche returned home yesterday from the Chamberlain Hunt Academy, Port Gibson, Miss., where they have been attending school. They will spend the vacation with their parents here.

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Photographer DeZalba showed us some fine snap shot photographs that he took recently of bicyclists at the Driving Park. The work is about the finest of its kind that we have ever seen.

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Lieut. Huber Treille left this morning for White Castle and other points in the interest of the work he is selling entitled, “The True History of the Confederacy.”

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Miss Louise Schaff, who was quite seriously bruised by falling off a step ladder while hanging some curtains a few days ago at her father’s home, is new able to be up and about.

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Lillie Bowman, the colored girl who was so brutally beaten by her father on Monday, has disappeared from her home and her present whereabouts are unknown to her people. She is said to have expressed a determination to run away as soon as she was able, and it is supposed that she has sought protection with some of her friends down the bayou. Her mother and sister started off today in search of her.

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Mrs. Smith, the amiable wife of the well known Cincinnati shoe drummer of that name, is spending a few weeks in our city, stopping at the Nicholls Hotel. Her husband will shortly arrive here when he will be joined in his commercial travels by his wife.

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Mr. Jos. M. Coughlin left here this morning via the steamer Louisiana for McBride’s Belle Grove plantation located at Ellendale post office, Terrebonne parish, where he takes charge of the mechanical department of the Belle Grove sugar refinery.

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Electrician Will. Owens of the Great Southern Telephone and Telegraph Co. after being away at Baton Rouge and other places for several months is again in Donaldsonville and will resume work with his brother, Linesman John Owens.

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Mr. Abel Landry, the successful Napoleonville liveryman, paid our city a visit yesterday and while here was the guest of Mr. Henry A. Landry.

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Our colored friends are to be give a surprise party at the home of Eliza and Martha Hargans on Sunday evening next.

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Mr. and Mrs. Gus Weill of White Castle spent yesterday in our city visiting friends.

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Mr. E. Levy of Texas was in our city and will leave today for New York.

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Mr. M. Meyer of Port Gibson, Miss., and Mr. E. Netter and wife of the same city are at the Nicholls Hotel.

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Miss Sophia Mayer, an amiable young lady from White Castle, spent yesterday with her Donaldsonville friends.

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The body of Capt. T. P. Leathers, temporarily entombed in the Metairie cemetery at New Orleans, will be taken to Natchez for burial early in the fall.

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The three women who were found suffering with the small pox in a house on Taylor street, have been removed to the pest house and are doing well under the ministration of Dr. Thibaut, the city physician. It is not expected that there will be any further cases as all necessary precautions have been taken to prevent the spread of the disease.

JUNE 19, 1896

onice

Martha Taylor, the name of an old colored woman who may frequently be seen on our streets, is probably the oldest woman in the State, if not in the entire country, her age from computations made by facts furnished a Times representative being somewhere between 104 and 107 years. Despite this extreme age, Aunt Martha as she is called, is quite spry and is in full possession of all her faculties, her eyesight being still keen and her hearing decidedly acute. The story of this old woman’s life as she told it in The Times office yesterday is decidedly interesting.

She was born a slave in Llewellyn county Virginia, her master being Wm. Pierce. At quite an early age she was taken to Mobile, where when about 15 years of age, she married a man named Taylor. After she had been wedded several years and had four children, she was bought by Camille Mire of St. James and it was while she was being taken through New Orleans to her new home that she saw Gen. Jackson, who, she said, had just arrived in that city. In speaking of the incident, she said, “I ‘member seein’ the general an’ bless yer heart honey I don’t likely to forget dat cause chery one was a follerin him an’ the levee was jus black wid people. Does I member how he looks? Why of cose I does, he was a might fine lookin’ soldier.”

After she had been in St. James for some time, during which she again remembers seeing Andrew Jackson when he came down the bayou where he remained for several days as the guest of Dr. Cottman, Aunt Martha was bought by Jackson Powers of this city. She remained with this gentleman until the war broke out when Mr. Powers and his son Thomas were both killed in battle and Mrs. Powers went to her father’s home in Louisville.

Since that time Aunt Martha has remained here working for many families until growing infirmities have caused her to cease from labor and she is now earning a precarious livelihood by nursing and old paralytic lady with whom she has been for four years. The only other resources she has is four dollars a month which is allowed her by the city.

Photographer DeZalba has just taken an excellent photograph of the old woman and it is proposed to sell them for her benefit. Mr. DeZalba contributing ten cents for every picture that is sold.

While not in actual want Aunt Martha could be made a great deal more comfortable than she is, and her extreme age commend her to our generous people and her last days of so long a life should be made as happy and tranquil as possible.

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Mr. Jos. M. Keating, the popular and hustling manager of the Ascension Lumber Yard in this city, called at the Times office this morning. Mr. Keating says that their lumber business is booming. They are now loading two flatboats for a big order from down the bayou. In order to accommodate their country patrons a telephone (No. 58) has been placed in the office.

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Last evening a number of young ladies and gentlemen assembled at the residence of Mrs. Luke Eris and from here proceeded to the home of Mr. Dominique Gentil to serenade and surprise Miss Marie Gentil, in honor of her birthday. Upon arriving at Mr. Gentil’s residence about 10 o’clock, it was found that every one had retired and the party noiselessly made their way to the gallery and the Pastime Orchestra composed of Jos. Babin, mandolin; Alfred Landry and Luke Eris, guitars; Nic. Eris, bass viol. and Andrew Joseph, who had been specially secured, violin, struck up a serenade which soon awakened the greatly surprised inmates of the house and in a short time the doors were thrown open and the party invited in. Dancing at once began and was kept up until an early hour this morning. The music was a feature of the occasion, the playing by the young men, who were all members of the Pastime Club, being remarkably fine. The following ladies and gentlemen constituted the party: Alice Celia and Lydia Ramirez, Marie and Ella Eris, L. Parks, Edna Michel, Loretta Ferrier, Leonie Cire, and Messrs. Albert Duffel, Clem. Mollere, Thos. Parks, Ed. Villeminot, Joseph and Paul Gisclard, Andrew Babin and Mr. D. Gentil and wife. Mesdames D. Landry and Wm. Parks were the chaperons.

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Mr. Jacob Blum, an old and highly respected resident, died last night at the Nicholls Hotel, which place he has made his home for the past three years, in the 72d year of his age. The deceased, who was born in Germany, but for the past 50 years had been a resident of the State, had for some time retired from business and for the past five years had suffered greatly from dropsy and heart disease which confined him most of the time to a chair. The malady became more acute a couple of days ago and the end came last evening at 10 o’clock while he was seated in his chair. Mr. Blum at one time removed here to New Orleans, but would return to this place every year to spend the winter. He leave a wife, nee Mary Klopman, who has been his patient helpmeet and nurse during his long illness. The funeral took place at 1 o’clock this afternoon from the Nicholls Hotel, Rabbi I. L. Leucht officiating. The burial was under the direction of the masonic rites, the deceased being a member of Perfect Union Lodge F. and A.M. Interment was made in the Jewish Cemetery.

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Messrs. Fred. Linde and Paul A. Wutke, the patentees of the new car coupler, have signed a contract with the Sherman Iron Works of Sherman, Texas, for the manufacturing of their couplers. The large offer made by this company is a guarantee that they consider it a good thing and as Sherman is a prominent railroad centre a fine opportunity is afforded for the introduction of the patent coupler to where it will do the most good.

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Manager J. M. Ourso is getting everything in readiness for the big race meeting beginning next Wednesday. Most of the horses entered will be at the track by Sunday.

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There was only one marriage license issued by Clerk Landry this week, and that was to Gloster Brown and Minerva Mickens.

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The new house at the corner of Iberville and Lessard streets is about completed. It is a very handsome structure.

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The ice factory is being run at its full capacity these days, the demand for congealed water being unusually large.

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Miss Erskine Kock is spending a while at Belle Alliance, having come up from New Orleans last week.

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Miss Fannie Hewitt of New Orleans is the guest of her sister, Mrs. C. R. Gaines of Belle Alliance.

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Messrs. Frank and Linden Sharp, the handsome young sons of Mr. W. R. Sharp of Belle Alliance, are at home for the vacation period.

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Mr. C. C. Clifton has been very sick but is better now.

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Miss G. Ganier, one of the most popular young ladies of St. James, is the guest of Mr. J. C. Mire and family. All hope her stay will be a long one.

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Capt. J. Dodd Smith was in Baton Rouge a couple of days this week.

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Miss C. Chase has returned to her home in Washington, where she will spend the summer. While on the bayou she made many friends who will be glad to see her return when her vacation is over.

JUNE 22, 1896

insurance

Mr. Joseph Maurin, the energetic and hustling agent of the Tommie Ross Whiskey, is making this popular brand the standard in this parish and it is now on sale everywhere. The success of this whiskey is not hard to understand for it is a fine, prime, high class article and once drank it is called for again. Add to this merit the keen, active and popular business methods of its agent, Mr. Jos. Maurin, in pushing its sale, we have a combination in which failure is an impossibility.

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Elizabeth Dupre, colored, wife of Charles Dupre, died yesterday, aged 41 years. The funeral took place this afternoon from the Nazarene Baptist church. The interment was in the Protestant cemetery.

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The commencement exercises at the Ascension Academy at the Opera House Friday evening, attracted one of the largest audiences ever gathered in this place of amusement, and it is safe to say that nearly as many were turned away as gained admission. The audience was not only large but extremely enthusiastic, every number on the long program being vigorously applauded.

The exercises opened with a well executed overture by the Phoenix orchestra, and the curtain went up on a group of the older scholars who sung quite pleasingly the popular melody “Sunshine of Paradise Alley.” Then follows three excellent recitations, “Willie’s Speech,” “The Night Wind” and “Not So Easy” by Hudson Hunley, G. Donnaud Bentley and Clarence Poebe. “The Little Seamstress” was an admirable effort by Miss Junia Gingry that deserved plaudits.

“Unjust Suspicion,” a very pretty little comedietta was charmingly given by Misses Lily Feitel, Ada Gingry, Fanny Landry, Bella Landry, Nellie Price and Laura Landry.

The hoop drill by the primary department was very cleverly executed and proved to be one of the most interesting numbers of the program.

“Give and Take,” a pleasing dialogue with a splendid moral, was given by Miss Anna Lear and Raymond Capbern.

The tableau, “The May Queen,” was very pretty and was greeted with a shower of applause. The picture was well arranged and the grouping splendid.

“Examination Day” was then presented by a dozen, young lads and misses and it caught the fancy of the audience immensely.

“A Boy’s Pocket,” a very humorous effort, was recited with fine effect, eliciting a great deal of laughter by Vincent Ourso.

The popular song, “Oh, Uncle John,” was then rendered by the chorus in good style.

“Annie’s Party,” a comedy, was well presented by Robert Maurin and Misses Emma Lear, Cecile Creole, Augusta Heintz, Evelin Ourso, Mary Montamant, Anna Lear, Mary Bradford and Linda Acosta. This was followed by another pretty and striking tableau “The Gypsy Camp.”

“The Man and Woman That Waited” was cleverly presented by G. Donnaud Bentley and Miss Edna Cire.

The commedy, “Dr. Cure All,” followed and Master G. Donnaud Bentley in the title character proved himself a comedian of no mean ability. All the characters in this piece were well taken and it was very amusing.

Dr. John S. Thibaut, President of the School Board then awarded the prizes among the number being a handsome gold medal offered by Mayor Leche for the best essay, which was won by Miss Laura Harp who took as her subject, “The United States.”

The essay was a most thoughtful and scholarly production and Miss Harp is to be congratulated on her ability.

The medals awarded were as follows:

  • Scholarship in High School: Miss Haidee Weeks.
  • Scholarship in Grammar: Miss Ione Weeks.
  • Attendance in Principal’s Department: Misses Ada Gingry and Fanny Landry.
  • Attendance and scholarship in Grammar B. Department: Miss Emma Wagner.
  • Attendance in Primary A Department: Miss Aurelia Rodeillat.
  • Attendance Primary E. Department: Miss Jennie Gingry.
  • For Spelling Primary C. Department: Miss Marie Michel.
  • For Attendance Primary D. Department: Joseph Woolrich.

The exercises closed with the tableau, “Gods and Goddesses,” which ended one of the most ambitious programs ever presented by this excellent Academy and which reflected the highest credit on the pupils.

Between the first and second acts of the comedy, “Dr. Cureall,” Master G. Donnaud Bentley, on behalf of the first class, presented Prof. R. N. Sims Jr. with a silver bicycle name plate. Mr. Sims was taken by complete surprise but managed to make a very neat speech of acceptance.

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A bicycle race, two miles and a half, was ridden at the Ascension Driving Park on Friday evening between M. D. Bringier of this parish and “Kid” Comeaux of New Orleans. Bringier set the pace and led Comeaux until the last lap when the latter put on steam and forged to the front, winning the race and purse at $30 quite handily. Both riders were greatly exhausted when the race was finished.

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A telephone message from Bayou Goula this morning stated that Miss Hebert was still alive and that there were hopes of saving her life. She will be taken to Charity Hospital, New Orleans, on tonight’s train and the ambulance in charge of the students of the hospital will meet the train on its arrival in New Orleans. Two additional arrests were made yesterday when the colored woman residing next door to Mrs. Landry and her daughter were placed in custody on suspicion that they knew more about the murder than they told. Detective Flood of New Orleans has arrived there and now has charge of the case. The colored people of the parish, on the account of the high feeling running there, have become panic stricken and are leaving in droves.

Sheriff St. Martin was specially secured by the people of Iberville parish to work up the murder case. The Sheriff admits that it is a hard tangle to unravel but believes that the murderers will eventually be run down.

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On Saturday evening while Guy Williams, colored, was plowing on the Belle Helene plantation, he stepped on a big rattle snake pilot which bit him twice on the foot. Williams was taken to the store where he was heavily doused with whiskey by Judge Gondran and Prof. Jones, while a doctor was being sent for. Williams leg began to swell and assumed unusual proportions from the poison. Today the swelling began to subside and he was pronounced out of danger. The snake was a very big one but Williams was too frightened to kill it.

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Rev. Dr. J. T. Sawyer of New Orleans will preach at the Donaldsonville Methodist Church next Saturday evening at 7:30 o’clock and the following Sunday morning at 11 o’clock. The regular quarterly church conference will be held at 4 o’clock on Saturday afternoon.

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Mr. and Mrs. G. Feitel yesterday entertained Mr. Ed. Levy, Mr. Marc Levy and Mrs. Levy of New Orleans, Mr. Ed. Feitel of St. James, Mr. and Mrs. L. Levy of Barton and their son, Mr. Jasmin Feitel of Elm Hall.

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Mrs. J. Capone went to New Orleans yesterday and spent the day with relatives.

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Miss Bella Lauve, accompanied by her sister, Mrs. Henry Poche of Lauderdale, were in town for a few hours today.

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Messrs. Sidney Vega and Jos. Maurin, who had charge of the bicycle races at the Driving Park yesterday, did their work well.

JUNE 23, 1896

netter

It now looks as if the murderers of Mrs. Telesphore Landry and the assailants of Miss Madeline Hebert had been run down and that justice, terrible but deserved, would be meted out to them.

Among the first suspicioned by Sheriff St. Martin when he took charge of the case was the negro Woody, who resided next door to Mrs. Landry and he was promptly put under arrest. Under the sharp cross questioning of Sheriff St. Martin his story of how he passed the night was both contradictory and suspicious. He admitted hearing groans in the Landry house and when asked why he had not gone to see what was the matter, replied: “I never like to see blood it makes me sick.”

“Oh, then you knew they had been assaulted,” replied Sheriff St. Martin, to which Woody made a confused answer.

Yesterday, a thorough search was made of Woody’s house that brought to light what looks like conclusive evidence of guilt.

A wash basin was found with some bloody water in it and a garment was also found with traces of blood on it. On one of the outer doors there was an imprint as if made by bloody fingers.

Added to this, evidence has been secured to show that Woody in company with the two Whittaker negroes was seen on the street in the vicinity of the house about midnight on the night of the murder.

These developments have wrought the feelings of the people to the highest pitch, and it is doubtful if the counsel of the leading men not to resort to lynch law, but allow the courts to deal with them will prevail, and there is liable to be an attack on the jail, and a lynching at any hour.

Miss Madeline Hebert was taken to the Charity Hospital, New Orleans, on yesterday afternoon’s train, and there are hopes now that her life will be saved.

In one of her lucid moments yesterday, Miss Hebert said to her nurse: “What is the matter with me, what has happened?”

The nurse answered: “Madeline a terrible thing has happened, some one has hit you with a hatchet. Do you remember anything about it? Don’t you know who it was?”

In a dazed sort of way she replied: “Hit me with a hatchet? Why I know nothing about it. It must have been when I was asleep.”

Mr. George Maillan, a clerk at M. Netter & Co.’s and a resident of Bayou Goula, to home the Daily Times is much indebted for information regarding the case, said he knew the negroes who were under arrest and that they were a bad lot, and he had had trouble with them himself.

Mr. Landry, a nephew of the murdered woman, was in this city last night, and said he had no doubt but that the right men had been arrested as the evidence was growing every hour against them.

The New Orleans Picayune this morning says that Miss Hebert stood the journey from Bayou Goula to New Orleans well and suffered no ill effects from it. The ambulance was at the depot and she was conveyed as rapidly as possible to the hospital. The surgeons there at once redressed the wounds and after a careful examination remarked that there was a hope of saving her life, but that she must be kept very quiet.

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A story was current in this city early this morning that an attempt had been made to attack the Plaquemine jail to secure the five prisoners, three man and two women, for the purpose of lynching them but later news proved this to be a mere rumor. The Plaquemine jail is a strong, substantial structure liable to withstand any ordinary assault upon it. The feeling of the best people in Plaquemine is averse to mob violence, as it is believed that the courts can be relied upon to mete out justice just as severe as that any mob might inflict, and these people will do what they can to thwart such violence.

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Miss Mary L. Boyer, the secretary of the Moonlight Social Club of Bayou Goula, sends the following to the Daily Times: “Owing to the terrible tragedy of the murder of Mrs. Telesphore Landry and the murderous assault upon Miss Madeline Hebert at Bayou Goula on the night of the 19th inst., and consequent sadness and gloom pervading the community where they were so well known and high esteemed, the ‘moonlight hop’ which was to have been given by the Moonlight Social Club on the 24th inst. at the residence of Mr. P. L. Viallon, is indefinitely postponed.”

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The quarter-mile bicycle race at the Ascension Driving Park yesterday afternoon between Browse T. Bringier and Junius Comeaux for a purse of $70 was won by Bringier by one length in 37 3/4 seconds. The track was in good condition and both riders put forth their best efforts. There was a good crowd in attendance and Bringier was the favorite in the betting.

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The brutal murder of Mrs. Telesphore Landry, and the murderous attack upon her adopted daughter, Miss Hebert, has sent a thrill of horror all over this section of the State, and there is but one wish and hope expressed, and that is that the assassins may be speedily apprehended and their foul crime fully avenged. There has for the past two or three months been a wave of crime sweeping over the State, and in every instance the victims have been white and their assailants colored and one cannot help but view it as a legacy of the last gubernatorial campaign in which Captain Pharr and his associates on the stump, stirred up the very worst passions of the colored race in their efforts to coddle them and secure their votes. The Times at that time pointed out the great danger of the utterances of Capt. Pharr and frequently alluded to them as incendiary and liable to incite and foster murder and arson. It looks in the light of events of the past two or three months that our fears and forebodings at that time were amply justified. The colored people have become restless and crime is following in its wake. It must be stamped out, and stamped out effectively, and no efforts or money should be spared in bringing to justice the Bayou Goula assassins and from the tone of the people we have no reason to fear that there will.

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William Kenner, the Belle Helene mail carrier, while on the Claiborne street canal between Rumsey Duke’s store and Oscar Gentil‘s bakery, had his attention attracted by a little colored boy screaming for his father about 10 o’clock this morning. Kenner could not make out what the trouble was but looking in the canal he saw something floating in the water and without a moment’s hesitation he jumped in and pulled out what proved to be a little colored girl about nine years old. She was unconscious and Kenner began at once to resuscitate her and had succeeded in doing so when Chief of Police Maher came to his assistance. The little boy was so scared that he could not tell the name of either himself or father, but grabbing hold of his sister started off on a run. It was only Kenner’s promptness in jumping in the call that saved the little girl’s life for she was about to go down for the last time when he grabbed her.

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Donaldsonville’s boss pastryman, Pierre Blanc, has the thanks of the Daily Times force for an assortment of cakes, which were delicious and greatly relished.

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The sugar factory on Mrs. James Teller‘s Riverside plantation is undergoing a general overhauling under the able superintendence of Chief Engineer Joseph Worrel. Mr. E. F. Landry is among Mr. Worrel’s helpers.

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Friend Ned Comstock left here yesterday for Planchette, Pointe Coupee parish, where he will spend about two weeks as the guest of his brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Sam P. Lacour.

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The officers here have received instructions to apprehend strange and suspicious looking colored men on the charge that they may have been connected with the Bayou Goula tragedy.

JUNE 24, 1896

honey

The rumor that circulated throughout the city yesterday that a Wild West Show had arrived here was unfounded and arose from the fact that two men seated on the back of a little pony were seen galloping madly into town about 7 o’clock a. m. showing feats of bare back horsemanship rarely seen outside of a circus tent. The men were Joe Park and H. Treille Jr. and there is a story back of this double bare back act. Both started for the McCall plantation to work yesterday morning. Park on his wheel and Treille on his pony. The storm came up and Joe’s wheel became stalled in the mud and he had to leave it at a wayside house. He then started to walk home when Treille came along on his pony and took him up and from that time until they reached the city it was a two ring circus and Joe is liable to create a corner in liniments and lotions in order to ease the bruises and soreness caused by his bare back exploits.

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Joseph Romano, a former resident of this city, but for the past three years residing at Morgan City, was drowned at the latter place on Friday last. The deceased was quite well known here and was a brother-in-law of Mr. Gaspard Messina. The drowning was the result of an accident.

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Mrs. A. J. Bachman, and her sweet little daughter Rhea, and Mrs. Geo. Mazret of New Orleans are spending a few weeks at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Sanchez.

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There are no new developments in the Bayou Goula tragedy today, but the coils are said, however, to be slowly but surely tightening around the colored man, Woody, and the Whittakers. Detective Flood is expected from New Orleans tomorrow. Miss Hebert is said to be getting on nicely at the Charity Hospital in New Orleans and the surgeons think that she will recover.

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An enjoyable surprise party was given at the residence of Mr. S. Prejean on the Halfway plantation last evening in honor of the birthday of Miss Felicie Prejean, the handsome and charming daughter of Mr. Prejean. The party assembled at the residence of Mr. Milton Sanchez and from there proceeded to Mr. Prejean’s home, taking Miss Felicie completely by surprise. Among those at the party were: Misses Velma Truxillo, Ella Acosta, Emily Daigle, Marie Ronquillo, Constance Ronquillo, Emeline Jumonville, Mary Sanchez, Virginia Truxillo, Nana Truxillo, Lilly Hernandez, Mesdames Geo. mazret, Arthur Prejean, A. J. Bachmin, Antoine Acosta, Milton Sanchez and Messrs. Honore Ayraud, Jules Ayraud, Jos. LeBlanc, C. Landry, Jules LeBlanc, Edward LeBlanc, P.H. Truxillo, Philip Truxillo, Tony Truxillo, Camille Ruiz, Franklin Ruiz, Albert Ruiz, Cadet S. A. Alleman, Emile Hernandez, John A. Buquoi, Jos. Bell, Edgar Jumonville, K. A. Gauthreaux and Milton Sanchez. Music for the dances was furnished by a piano and violin. During the evening punch and other refreshments were served.

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Our genial and efficient postmaster, Mr. Solomon Klotz, visited the Crescent city this week for the purpose of consulting an occulist. His beautiful new gold spectacles give him a distinguished appearance.

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Among those who enjoyed the excursion to the city last Sunday were Dr. J. D. Damare, Judge Albert Kockritz and Jos. Verret. All are full of talk of their trip.

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Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Folse of St. James parish will celebrate the 25th anniversary of their wedded life on July 3 and it is rumored down here that it will be par excellence, the crowning event of the season. We trust Napoleonville will be fully represented on the occasion.

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Miss Bella Gilbert, a charming and accomplished belle of this town, has to the regret of her numerous friends been confined to her bed with fever but we are glad to state that she has entirely recuperated.

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Messrs. Fred. Linde and Paul A. Wutke have returned home from Sherman, Texas, where they made a contract with the Sherman Foundry for the manufacture and introduction of their patent car coupler. The couplers are to be given a test on the Missouri, Kansas and Texas railroad at an early day and both the patentees and the manufacturers are enthusiastic over the interest the railroad people are taking in the invention, the Sherman Foundry being particularly sanguine that the couplers will be a great success.

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Leon Smith and Eugene Dright, two young boys, were arrested in the market for fighting and arraigned before Mayor Leche on a charge of disturbing the peace. His Honor after giving them a severe lecture and warning them never to repeat the offense allowed them to depart.

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The Daily Times is indebted to Mr. Henry Landry, the handsome and courteous mixologist of the Welcome saloon, for a pitcher of ice cold beer and some fresh pretzels which he sent to our office yesterday. Accept our hearty thanks, friend Henry.

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A story was on the streets this morning that one Italian had murdered another in White Castle last evening, but the report could not verified.

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Mr. J. E. LaBlanc, president of the Police Board of Assumption, was a visitor to the city today.

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Mr. Joseph Dudenhofer will do the carpenter work on the new masonic building, and Mr. Andrew Gingry will superintend the work on the part of the lodge.

JUNE 25, 1896

race

There is very little being done in the Bayou Goula tragedy by the officials who seem to feel that they have the right ones in custody and all their efforts are now directed in strengthening the testimony against them. Detective Flood, who has charge of the case, has been in New Orleans for the past two days on other business but is expected back tonight. Another slight link in the chain of evidence against Woody has been forged in the finding that one of the pickets between his and Mrs. Landry‘s house had been recently removed. There are now nine negroes, three women and six men, in jail at Plaquemine under suspicion of being either principals or accomplices in the murder. Miss Madeline Hebert has improved wonderfully since she has been in the Charity Hospital at New Orleans and is now in a fair way of recovery but she will be terribly disfigured for life.

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James LeBlanc, aged 15 years, died in Bayou Goula on Saturday last from hyrdrophobia. About two months ago the boy was bitten by a pet dog on the lower lip but at the time nothing was thought of it. About a week ago, however, he was taken quite ill and had to go to bed and all the symptoms of hydrophobia became apparent. On Saturday last he was seized with violent convulsions in one of which he died.

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Misses Aline and Stella Vega left on the 11:20 train this forenoon for Cottonport, Avoyelles parish, where they will spend several days with their winsome friend, Miss Ethel Ducote.

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Labadieville’s Park managers are making an effort to secure the bicycle race between Dick Godbery and Warren Guyol at their park for Sunday, July 5, and have offered a big purse as an inducement. We understand that no special effort has been made to secure this race for our park and it behooves our people to be up and doing and not left this race get away from here as it will be a big attraction.

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Mr. G. Blanchard, who formerly ran a store at Sunshine, Iberville parish, this week joined the clerical force at Cheap Tony’s.

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The requiem mass for the repose of the soul of the late James Teller will be sung at the Donaldsonville Catholic church tomorrow morning at 8 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances of the family are respectfully invited to attend.

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Miss Ella Bentley closes her first term at St. Mary’s Dominican Convent, New Orleans, today and will return home for a long vacation on tomorrow.

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Grading for the Mississippi and Lafourche railroad is now in progress over S. Prejean‘s Halfway plantation and the work will all be completed and in readiness for the ties in about four days.

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Our handsome young friend, Jos. Webre, who will soon become a D.D. S. is in the city spending a few days with his parents, Dr. and Mrs. Theo. Webre. Joe has been in the New River section of the parish for several weeks and came over to attend the Masonic ball given last night. He reports crops in rural Ascension fine and says that marriages in that vicinity are very plentiful. He will return to New River in a few days.

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Steamer Lynn J. and barges which were here about six weeks ago with the Daniel Boone show have been seized by United States Marshal on a warrant sworn out by W. C. Craft et alls. who claim they are due wages by the said steamer. Steamer Lynn J. is owned by Capt. Frank Ottendorfer and has not turned a wheel for several weeks.

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Miss Malvina Esneault, the lovely daughter of Mr. Albert Esneault, the enterprising lumberman of Faubourg Lapipe, left Tuesday with Mrs. F. L. Trepagnier for Patterson, La. to spend a few weeks at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jones, parents of Mrs. Trepagnier.

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Guy Williams, the colored man who was bitten by a rattlesnake pilot last week on the Belle Helene plantation, is slowly recovering and was yesterday pronounced out of danger.

JUNE 26, 1896

tribute

George Desobry, an old, white-haired, white whiskered man, aged about 78 years, has disappeared from his home in this city in a rather mysterious manner. The old man came here about 15 years ago and was apparently without a friend or relative in the world. He hired a small piece of land back of the St. Vincent Institute and began raising vegetables from the sale of which he made a living.

He kept this ladn until about two years ago, when he leased the garden back of the Episcopal rectory where he remained until Monday of this week, when he leased the garden back of the Episcopal recotry where he remained until Monday of this week, when he suddenly left for parts unknown, taking with him only the clothing that he wore and an old bible.

Desobry was always very eccentric having very little to say and never saying anything about himself or his previous life. Rev. Mr. A. Martin, the rector of the Episcopal church, in speaking of the old man’s disappearance today, said that he always acted strangely but was friendly to him up to a short time ago.

At his lodging place it was found that all of his things and other personal property had been left and it looked as if his departure had been a hurried and suddenly conceived one. Just before he went away he told someone that he had enough of this city and was going away but did not volunteer the information of his proposed destination.

A gentleman who knew the old man quite well said that he had acted oddly every since he had been here and his eccentricities at times were quite marked. He was a hard worker however, and managed to make a comfortable living from the ground that he cultivated.

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Robert Terrell, the crazy colored man who has been in the parish jail for about two months, continues to grow worse and has now become violent. Jailer Acosta keeps him constantly handcuffed and secure in his cell. Mr. Acosta is very anxious to get rid of this boarder and will be very much pleased when the court meets and disposes this case.

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Sheriff Triche of Assumption parish made an important arrest on last Monday when he captured Levy Thomas, colored, a convict who escaped from Spotwood camp, Nita levee, St. James parish, on Sept. 1, 1889. Thomas was under a life sentence for murder at the time and had served 14 years when he escaped. His whereabouts was never known until Monday when Sheriff Triche located him on the Anatole Landry plantation and put him under arrest. This was Sheriff Triche’s first arrest and he is naturally very proud of it. Thomas will be turned over to the State’s prison authorities at Baton Rouge.

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Mr. and Mrs. James Frost of this city are in Thibodaux visiting Mr. Frost’s father.

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Mr. Nestor Hebert, the able young St. James representative of the Singer Sewing Machine Co., was in our city yesterday.

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Johnny Dorsey will complete his term of imprisonment on tomorrow morning when Jailer Acosta will turn him out of his boarding house.

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At the Donaldsonville Bottling Co.’s factory Manager Goette said today that rainy weather had a depressing effect on the sale of their pop, the demand for it being lessened one half when the weather was wet.

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A silk shopping bag that was found near the opera house and the silver souvenir spoon breast pin that was picked up near St. Vincent’s Institute have been claimed, identified and returned to their owners. The Daily Times, with the announcement of their finding, had not been out an hour when Capt. Gus Lanier called at the office and identified the bag as the property of his mother-in-law, Mrs. L. Monnot. Today the breast pin was identified and turned over to Mrs. Jos. Cire, the mother of Amelie Cire, as the latter’s property. “Amelie will be a happy girl now,” said Mrs. Cire “for she has done nothing but cry ever since she lost it.” An advertisement in the Daily Times will recover a lost article every time.

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James Johnson, another of the Johnson family, was placed under arrest in A Bend yesterday by Deputy Sheriff Maher on suspicion of having some knowledge of the murder of Mrs. Landry at Bayou Goula.

A Times representative this morning, through the courtesy of Jailer Acosta, had a talk with Johnson in the jail. He is a rather tall, well built colored man with apparently more than ordinary intelligence. He said that he had been working for some time past on the Hermitage plantation and declared that he had not been in Bayou Goula for over two years. He denies all knowledge of any complicity in the crime there and says he was miles away at the time.

His arrest was on suspicion solely and some action will probably be taken in his case today and if the Sheriff of Iberville parish wants him he will be sent to the jail at Plaquemine.

Deputy Sheriff Maher this morning in speaking of Johnson’s arrest said that he received a communication from Mr. James Landry, the superintendent of the Hermitage plantation, requesting that Johnson be at once arrested. The deputy went to Marchandville where Johnson resides and found he was not there so he went across the river and found him at A Bend, where he was about to purchase a skiff. He put him under arrest and brought him to the jail. Mr. Maher expected that someone from Iberville would be up today to take the man away.

Word from Bayou Goula today was to the effect that all the work on the case was directed toward strengthening existing evidence against Woody and the Johnson family, and a denial was made of the story published in a New Orleans paper yesterday that the belief was becoming general that the murder was not done by colored men. It is said that considerable evidence has been secured that had not been made public.

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Mr. Milton Sanches, the energetic and wide-awake business manager of the Valenzuela store of Mr. S. Prejean, in Assumption parish, was in this city yesterday attending to business appertaining to the firm he represents. Mr. Sanchez visited Pass Christian for a couple of days last week for the purpose of securing comfortable accommodations for his wife, who will cave shortly to spend a few days at that splendid and breezy resort.

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Felix Bethancourt, at one time a resident of this parish in which he was born, died on Tuesday in Terrebonne parish, aged 70 years. Armand, a son of the deceased, was at one time in partnership with Mr. Sam. Ayraud in running the Riverside Hotel which was on the site of the present Nicholls Hotel. Deceased left here during the war and never came back.

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The residence of Mr. Alfred Esneault in Faubourg LaPipe is being repainted inside and outside by that expert manipulator of the brush, Sam Schefer of this city.

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Capt. Benjamin Johnson, one of the oldest and at one time the wealthiest steamboatman on the Mississippi, died in St. Louis yesterday. He was a bachelor and had no living relatives that are known of.

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A negro named Louis was committed to prison by Judge Israel yesterday on the charge of carrying concealed weapons. He was bailed out last night.

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Mrs. John Park was in New Orleans this week on a business trip.

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Ned West, alias Babe Will, who has been in jail for some time, was released yesterday upon paying the fine.

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There was only one marriage license issued the past week by Clerk Landry, and that was to William Gilmore and Evelene Mason.

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Albert Jones, colored, was committed to the parish prison last evening on a charge of disturbing the peace, by Justice H. C. Robinson, but was shortly after released by his brother going bail for him.

JUNE 29, 1896

tonic

Mrs. Cecile Melancon, the wife of Numa Acosta, the well known drayman of this city, died at her residence on Railroad avenue on Saturday evening and was buried last evening from the Catholic church. Deceased was a well known and very much beloved lady, and leaves a husband and seven small children to mourn her loss. Mrs. Acosta was taken sick about three weeks ago with a stomach affection and grew rapidly worse until death ended her sufferings.

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Mr. Joseph Dudenhofer, who has charge of the carpenter work of the new Masonic temple, said this morning that the building would be completed and in readiness for occupancy by October 1.

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The ball given by the Sweet Sixteen Club of Plaquemine at the Hope Opera house, Plaquemine, on Friday was a most delightful success and the guests from this city were pleased with the reception that were extended to them. Among those from here were: Misses Bertha Carmouche, Celestine Lestrapes, Ida Turner, Mamie Armitage, Sudie Robertson and Mrs. Paul Leche.

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The New Orleans Bargain store has been sold by Mr. Sylvan Tobias to his brother, Mr. Jasmin Tobias. The latter is a popular and hustling business man can be depended upon to keep up the big boom in business that this store has taken on by its energetic and liberal management.

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The half-mile race between Mr. J. M. Ourso Jr.’s “Bessie” and Mr. Jos. Dicharry‘s “Jugador,” for a purse of $50, was run at the Ascension Park yesterday afternoon and was won by Bessie in 53 1/2 seconds. Bessie again proved herself one of the best racers for that distance in this vicinity.

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Mr. James Landry, manager of Hermitage plantation, in this parish was in the city on Saturday, and speaking of the arrest of the colored man, Johnson, now in the parish prison here on suspicion of having something to do with the murder of Mrs. Telesphore Landry at Bayou Goula, said: “The colored man’s right name is George Johnson and his statement to the Daily Times that he worked for some time on the Hermitage plantation is false. He was employed on the plantation three and a half days in January and a half day in February. At the time of the murder he was missing from his home in Marchandville for four days. Sometime ago he left his home and went to live with Marcelite Johnson, one of the women now in jail at Plaquemine. His father-in-law, the driver at the Hermitage, however went after him and made him come back to his wife. In Marchandville he has the reputation of being the biggest chicken thief in that section and the colored people there are armed with shot guns laying for him. It was on account of Johnson’s suspicious action and his absence from home at the time of the murder, with his connection with the Johnson family, that led to his arrest.

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Henry Hakenjos, who at one time was barkeeper at the Nicholls Hotel, died in New Orleans last evening in the 30th year of his age. In December 1894 the deceased married Miss Adele Rodeillat of this city. Yesterday word reached this city of his serious illness and Miss Laura Rodeillat, accompanied by Mr. Guy Dunning, went at once to New Orleans, reaching there before his death. This afternoon, Mrs. F. Rodelilat and her son, Lazar, left for New Orleans on the Valley road to attend the funeral. Deceased leaves a widow and one child, a boy, not quite a year old. During his stay here, Mr. Hakenjos made many friends who will read of his death with the sincerest regret.

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Victor Suarez, who was so badly hurt by a fall at McCall’s about three weeks ago, is rapidly recovering and he will be around and out again in a few days.

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Manager Daniel J. Foley of the Tallyho plantation, Iberville parish, spent yesterday in our city.

JUNE 30, 1896

Henry Storum, the well known and very corpulent Dutchman of this city, who has been keeping a sort of eating house and cooking for the working men who are building the new ferryboat, was arrested yesterday on a charge of robbing a freight car at the Texas and Pacific freight depot. Storum, it is claimed, was detected breaking a seal on one of the cars and Constable Vic. Cantrelle, who was put on the case, made a search of Storum’s place and succeeded in finding a sack of oats in a barrel over which was thrown a sack marked for E & J Kock. Fifty pounds of sugar were also found in an old box which Storum used for a trunk. Both the oats and the sugar had been missed from the car and he was placed under arrest and committed to the parish prison in default of $150 bail as fixed by Justice Lenares. The prisoner, it is alleged, claims that he is innocent of the robbery and that the goods were brought to his home by other people and he claims that he will divulge their names when he is brought up in the District Court for trial.

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Ex-Representative O. A. Bullion of Ascension was a pleasant caller at the Advocate officer yesterday. Dr. Bullion was in the city to meet his bright young daughter who returned from the Normal School at Natchitoches, and while here he took occasion to drop in and give us the news of his section. Cotton in that region he reports to be more promising this season than has been the case for many preceding years and while corn has been somewhat injured by the drought, the doctor thinks that the yield will not be as short as some suppose. Dr. Bullion, being an old Confederate veteran, is naturally enthusiastic over the trip he proposes to make to the great reunion at Richmond, and also to the dedication of the Winchester monument – Baton Rouge Advocate.

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Justice Henry C. Robinson of the second ward last evening committed to the parish jail John Stewart for disturbing the peace, Henry Johnson for carrying concealed weapons and Levi Levin for disorderly conduct. This morning they paid their fines and were liberated by Jailer Acosta.

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Mr. and Mrs. L. Lemmel, Misses Lillie and Amelia Kling and Messrs. Kahn and Marx Weil, all of Napoleonville, were in our city today to set the tombstone of Maurice Kling, a brother of the Misses Kling who died last year.

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Miss Ella Bentley, the charming and accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Bentley of the Donaldsonville Chief, has returned home from her first term in the St. Mary’s Dominican Convent, New Orleans, where she won distinguished honors, receiving premiums for English composition, poetry and mathematics. In addition Miss Ella received a silver medal for printing and composition work done on the “Salve Regina,” a magazine published by the Nuns of that worthy institution. Since her return home Miss Ella has been the recipient of many social courtesies and congratulations from her friends who welcome her return.

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Antoine Mathieu and Mose Williams, colored, were arraigned before his honor, Mayor Leche, yesterday afternoon on a charge of running a game of cards, gambling and disorderly conduct. They were convicted and fined $5 each. Warrants were also out for the arrest of Rodolph Guedry and Jim Wallace, on the same charges but they took leg bail and skipped out, but Chief Maher has no doubt but that he will soon have them in custody.

 

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