Ascension Parish Genealogy, Newspaper articles

Donaldsonville Daily Times – May 1896

Local happenings in the May 1896 editions of The Daily Times of Donaldsonville with local ads thrown in for fun:

MAY 1, 1896

boarding
Mr. George Vives of Philadelphia Point was a visitor to our city today.


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Mr. Henry Dallas, the well known drummer of a New Orleans house, was in the city today.

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When Mayor Leche closed his speech of acceptance at the courthouse last night the band played “I Love You.”

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Mr. Abner F. Folse of Napoleonville was a welcome caller at the Daily Times office this morning.

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Mr. Henry McCall of this parish was the principal speaker at the Pharr meeting that was held last night in New Orleans.

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Mr. E. N. Pugh of this city was one of the gentlemen on the platform at the Pharr meeting in New Orleans last evening.

———————————————————————————————————————————-Mr. W. O. Pomarede, a well known knight of the grip, familiarly known as “Pom,” was in the city a few hours this morning after which he departed for St. John parish.

———————————————————————————————————————————-Mr. Mayer Cahen of Assumption was a welcome visitor to our city today. Mr. Cahen is the only uncontested delegate from our state to the Republican National convention to be held in St. Louis on June next.

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There were in attendance at the wedding of Mr. Samuel S. Brand to Miss Belle Smith at Bayou Sara on Wednesday, Mr. Auguste Braud, the groom’s cousin who served as best man, Mr. Paul Braud, Mr. F. Braud, Miss Angele Braud and Miss Laura Braud, all of Faubourg LaPipe. Mr. Paul Braud returned home last evening and the others of the party will reach here tonight over the Mississippi Valley road.

MAY 4, 1896

bicycle
On Friday afternoon Mr. Joseph L. Rolling sold his one-half interest in the Point Houmas plantation to Mrs. James Webster (Widow Cofield) of New Orleans. The price is reported at $30,000 cash. Mr. Rolling sold his interest in this plantation so that he might be enabled to devote his entire time and attention to his St. Rose plantation, St. James Parish, of which he recently became the owner.

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On Saturday forenoon fire was discovered in a small out building in the rear of the residence of Mr. J. E. Capbern on Lafourche street. An alarm was promptly sounded and there was a quick response of the fire department which in a short time extinguished the flames before any great damage was done. This was the first call the department has had in about three months but the boys showed that they had not become rusty during this lengthy inactivity.

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Miss Sophia Mayer of White Castle is the guest of the Misses Levy.

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Genial Isaac Rennyson and gallant Robt. Burns of Evan Hall were in our city Sunday.

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Mr. and Mrs. Joe Capone spent Sunday in New Orleans, returning home this evening.

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Mr. Sabin Savoie, one of Assumption’s sugar planters, was a visitor to our city yesterday.

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Mr. Wm. Dill, the well known copper smith and sheet iron worker, was in our city yesterday.

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Widow Frank Rieger is now conducting a small grocery and retail ice depot on Mississippi street.

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Mr. D. J. Foley of Bayou Goula was among the people from neighboring towns in our city yesterday.

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Misses Augusta Feitel and Edna Joseph are in Thibodaux spending a while with the former’s sister, Mrs. S. Polmer.

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Mr. James Landry, manager of the Hermitage plantation, was in our city yesterday circulating among his numerous friends.

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Justice Maurin has put on a disguise. He has shaved off that dashing mustache and now none of his friends can recognize him.

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Some of our firemen went to Napoleonville Saturday to see the exhibition of the working of the new Babcock fire engine that the Napoleonville fire department has just purchased.

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Three new cases os small pox – two men and one woman – were discovered by the authorities this morning.
Two of the cases, those of the men, were found in the notorious “Buzzards’ Roost”  and the woman in a cabin on Taylor, between Houmas and Lafourche streets.
All three had evidently been suffering from the disease for over a week during which time they have been running about the neighborhood.

A special meeting of the Council will be held this evening to take action in the matter for no arrangements have been made for the reporting of the pest house which was closed this morning. In the meantime, the patients are in quarantine in their rooms and all of whom they have come into contact with have been vaccinated.

It is evident that something will have to be done with Buzzards’ Roost for it is now a vile pest breeder and a menace to public health.

Dr. John S. Thibaut, the city physician, was seen by a Times representative this afternoon, said that the imperative necessity of the hour was general vaccination and that this should be attended to at once.

MAY 5, 1896

BANK

The sudden reappearance of small pox in this city yesterday led Mayor Leche to call a special meeting of the Council last evening to take vigorous measures to stamp out the disease.

There was a full attendance of Aldermen when Mayor Leche called the body to order. Dr. J. S. Thibaut, the city’s physician, made a statement as to the new cases discovered and advised that the Council issue an order for general vaccination.

Dr. Thibaut’s suggestion was very promptly acted on and he was ordered to proceed at once and vaccinate everyone in the vicinity of the outbreak of the disease and to make such vaccination compulsory.

The question of reopening the pest house was discussed but it was decided that for the present, at least, the patients should be confined to their homes under a guard to prevent them from getting away.

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The matter of stray dogs running the streets was taken up and the police ordered to proceed at once to poison every unlicensed dog found on the street.

———————————————————————————————————————————-Mayor Leche in discussing the small pox situation with a representative of the Daily Times said that the present cases of small pox were imported ones. Being at the head of the bayou this city was being made the headquarters for all the colored coal heavers and roustabouts who were now here in numbers, unloading coal for the different plantations. They always lodged in places like Buzzards’ Roost and it was from this that the disease had broken out afresh again.

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Marriage licenses

  • Emile Richard to Louise Alonzo
  • Lewis Parks to Nancy Bilty
  • Edmund Baker to Pauline Mittington

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Edwin Arceneaux, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Arceneaux, died this morning, aged 10 months and 15 days. The remains will be taken tomorrow morning to St. James for burial. The child had been lying between life and death for the past 10 days, but its parents had been hopeful that it would be spared for them and in their grief they have the sympathy and every consolation that their friends can give.

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The case of Julia Lefort vs. Mary Hargins involving the ownership of a gold-plated breastpin valued at $4 took up two hours of valuable time. The court took the case under advisement.

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Bush Hall, colored, was tried for assault and battery on Sarah Campbell, and the evidence showing that it was merely a falling out between the pair, Hall was placed under $400 bonds and ordered to pay $4.25 costs.

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Last evening at 8:30 a quarrel arose in an eating house at A Bend between two colored men, Robert Hampton and Ike Wethers, arising out of a long standing feud between the man, during which Wethers drew a revolver and shot Hampton in the right breast, inflicting a wound which in all probability will result fatally.
Immediately after firing the shot Wethers made his escape, going down the river. Constable Isaac Murray immediately started in pursuit of him, but so far he has eluded capture.

Dr. E. K. Sims of this city was hastily summoned to attend the wounded man and on his arrival made an examination of the wound which he pronounced very serious.

This morning a Times representative visited the scene of the shooting and gleaned the following facts: Hampton, who is a resident of A Bend, and Wethers, who is from Laurel Ridge but employed on the Riverside plantation, have been for some time at swords’ points over some disagreement that had arisen between them. Last night the two men met in the eating house and at once hostilities began. After an exchange of a few words, Wethers pulled out a pistol and fired, the ball hitting Hampton in the right breast just below the armpit. In the excitement that followed the shot Wethers made good his escape and by the time that Constable Murray was informed of the crime had gotten far down the river. Constable Murray searched all night for the man but returned home this morning without having secured him. Hampton’s condition this morning was very critical and his death was hourly expected.

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Mr. Robt. Landry of Hohen Solms was in our city this morning.

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Mr. F. J. Eikel and family attended the Volk’s Fest in New Orleans, returning home today.

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Mr. and Mrs. Lazard Levy entertained in a charming manner a number of their friends at their home on Sunday evening.

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Misses Clementine Landry and Octavie Terrio were guests Saturday of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Landry on the Halfway plantation.

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Mr. Lee Lewmann of the firm of M. T. Lewmann & Co., the contractors who erected the Catholic church in this city and the courthouse at Napoleonville, left last evening for Louisville, Ky.

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Mr. Meyer Netter of the firm of Netter & Co. left Saturday to join his wife who has been staying for some time at Hotel Dieu, New Orleans. On Sunday in company with his wife, he left for Abita Springs.

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J. C. Bergeron has been appointed chief clerk of the steamer Teche, vice Leo Guillot, who resigned to accept the Tax Collectorship under the Hon. C. L. Triche, who was recently elected the Sheriff of Assumption parish.

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Mrs. R. Brunet, who has been ill for some time, we regret to announce, is much worse, her malady having taken a serious change. The lady’s friends, who are legions, are still hopeful she may yet be restored to health.

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Mr. T. A. LaFar, a prominent scientist, an old Confederate veteran and an orator of more than usual power, is in the city arranging for a lecture. His testimonials are of the highest including among those of Hon. Wm. Porcher Miles.

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Mr. Joseph Stribling, a handsome and prominent merchant of Bunkie, Avoyelles Parish, visited this city on Sunday on a pleasure trip and returned to his home the same night by the 10:26 Texas and Pacific train. Mr. Stribling’s trips to our city are becoming mighty numerous. We wonder what’s the attraction?

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Mr. E. B. Clapp, chief engineer of the Hermitage sugar factory, was a welcome visitor to our city Sunday.

 

MAY 6, 1896

hair

There is a general feeling in the city that something should be done toward getting rid of that pestilential nest of disease breeders of which the notorious Buzzards’ Roost is the most dangerous, the most flagrant and the greatest menace to public health. Dr. John S. Thibaut, the city physician, in speaking on this matter yesterday said that there was no question but that the city authorities would have to sooner or later take some action to lessen the dangers that constantly lurk in these low and filthy lodging houses and dens of corruption. Their sanitary condition was something appalling and in their present condition they were a perpetual menace. If it wasn’t small pox it would be something else contagious and they required constant watching. Another danger in them was the suppression of the facts regarding sickness, in the last instance, the people found with small pox having been sick a week before the authorities were notified, in the meantime the pestilential infected patients moved about not only in the neighborhood but in all parts of the city.

Mayor Leche said when seen that he was fully alive to the danger which was greater now than at any other season of the year. “You see,” said the Mayor, “this is the season of the year when planters lay in their coal and this brings here with the coal barges hundreds of coal wheelers and roustabouts of the lowest and filthiest order. They make this city their headquarters, sleeping in the 5 to 10-cent lodging houses and passing their idle hours in the dens that infest this neighborhood. Left to ourselves the city would not be in any danger, but the menace to health from this importation is great.”

Several of our merchants to whom the subject was broached were all unanimous in saying that something must be done to clean out this nest, some going to far as to suggest that the most drastic measures for its accomplishment.

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Mr. Charles Maher who returned from St. James parish last night, this morning gave The Daily Times information of a terrible tragedy at that place on Monday night.

A colored man who was suffering with small pox had been removed to a cabin and another colored man was left in charge of him. On Monday night the sick man became crazed and made a murderous assault upon his attendant. Breaking away from the maniac the guard drew a gun and shot the head literally off the sick man. He then set fire to the cabin, which was burned down, cremating the body of the dead negro.

The tragedy caused a great deal of excitement, but as the killing was clearly in self defense the man was not arrested and it is not probable that anything will be done to him.

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The Grand Jury last night reported a true bill for murder against Antonio Peroni and Luigia Rossia, charged with the murder Rocco Muscimeci. Rossia is in jail but Peroni is still at large.

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Ida Hall, a colored woman, who was discovered in the yard of Solozano & Hildago’s store, was removed to Buzzards’ Roost by Messrs. Solozano and Hidalgo upon the advice of Mayor Leche and Dr. Thibaut. It was reported that the woman was still in the yard of the store but this is not so as she was immediately removed and Messrs Solozano and Hidalgo are deserving of credit for the promptness with which they acted in this matter. The woman has quite a severe case of small pox.

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Judge Guion is looking quite jaunty in a stylish white straw hat.

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Charley LeBlanc took a run up to New Hope on his wheel this morning.

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Mr. Jos. M. Keating, the able bookkeeper of A. Wilbert’s Sons of Plaquemine, paid us a business call today.

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Miss Edith Ayraud of Sleepy Hollow has been spending some time with Mrs. H.C. Wilson of Palo Alto plantation.

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Mr. Oscar Billon, the popular district attorney, says he lays down the duties of his office with a feeling of relief.

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Widow S. Goette, who was quite sick with fever for the past several days, is now on the safe road to recovery.

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Mr. L. B. Rivet, the eldest son of Capt. Ben Rivet, agent of the Lafourche Transportation Co. Limited, has been appointed third clerk of the steamer Teche and on Monday took charge of the position. Young Rivet had been employed in his father’s office for two years or more, which makes him fully capable of discharging his new duties.

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The body of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Arceneaux was taken to St. James for burial on the 5:58 train this morning.

 

MAY 7, 1896

DRUMMERS

“I was very much pleased with the article in The Daily Times yesterday in reference to the pest holes in this city,” said Alderman Forcha this morning, “and I have no doubt but that it will arouse interest and end in something being done to meet the danger that the existence of these places daily threaten. There is not the least doubt but that something should be done, and that something at once, for as long as they exist the danger of epidemics exist and if drastic measures are necessary let us use them. These are my sentiments and I hope The Times will keep it up until the plague spots are destroyed for good. We are a little slow here and want prodding and I am glad to see that we are getting a little of it in that line from your paper.”

Mr. Chas. Maurin of C & L Maurin said this morning in reference to these dens: “I, in common with other merchants, endorse every word The Daily Times said yesterday in reference to the nest of disease breeders and believe that the most drastic measures should be used. I am in favor of getting up a subscription to purchase these buildings and after this is done set fire to them and burn them up. We have plenty of water in that vicinity so there would be no danger of the flames spreading. We have only one thing on earth that will purify these places and this is fire. We are all to much interested in our city and it s health to stand this nuisance and danger any longer.”

Alderman Vega when seen also expressed himself in sympathy with The Times movement to clean out or put in a better sanitary condition these holes. “They are a perpetual menace to the city’s health,” said Mr. Vega, “and I am in favor of the most heroic remedies to cleanse things up, for like everyone else I am much interested in the good health of the city which we cannot afford to imperil by closing our eyes to the danger that arises from these places.”

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Genial Albert Kaufman, after spending a pleasant time in New Orleans where he attended his sister’s wedding, has returned to Elm Hall.

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Mr. Chas Werner, Elm Hall’s head cooper, visited Donaldsonville on his bike Saturday last and returned here slightly muddy on Sunday evening.

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Mr. Dave Kahn left for New Orleans Monday to spend a few days.

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Messers Gus Weil and Emile Netter yesterday brought the body of the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. F. Baker from White Castle to this city for burial in the Jewish cemetery.

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Mrs. R. Brunet, whose dangerous illness was reported in our paper on Tuesday, died at 11:30 o’clock last night. Death came to this estimable lady calm and peacefully, like a tired child that falls asleep. About her bedside were her children whom she loved so well and to whom her memory will ever be a priceless legacy. Deceased was one of the best known and most highly respected ladies in the city. For years she kept a store corner Opelousas and Lessard streets. Kind, charitable and generous, she won the affection of all and her death will be most keenly regretted and generally mourned. She leaves four children, one son, who is a resident of New Orleans, and three daughters. Two of the latter are married to the Messrs. Jos. Rateau and Jules Teberne, merchants of this city, and the other, Miss Gabrielle Brunet, who resided with her mother. The funeral will take place at the Catholic church at 9:30 o’clock tomorrow morning.

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Senator-elect R. N. Sims leaves for Baton Rouge on Saturday.

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Mr. Sebastian Hidalgo gave us an appreciated call this morning.

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Mr. Sylvan Tobias and wife of Baton Rouge are in our city on a visit.

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Judge Guion is suffering from Job’s affliction and there will be no court next week.

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Miss Julia Pike is the guest for a few days of Mrs. E. H. Barton on St. Emma plantation.

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Miss Laura Richard left this morning for Abita Springs, where she will remain until the end of the month.

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Mr. Edward Van Brunt, a well known drummer from New Orleans, was in the city today. Van says he lost 10 pounds hustling about in the heat.

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Mr. James D. Crichlow left this morning for his home in Nashville and more than half a dozen charming young ladies were at the depot to say goodbye to him.

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Mr. James Barker, for the past three months in the employ of Mr. V. Maurin at the Palace Drug Store, has accepted a similar position in Plaquemine for which place he has left.

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Mr. L. Pugh, whose large sugar refinery at Napoleonville was burned a few weeks ago, has had three colored men arrested who are supposed to have been the incendaries. It is expected that those arrests will result in some important discovery as to the firebugs who have been practicing their nefarious art in that parish.

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Mrs. J. B. Ford of Bellewood has returned home after a lengthy stay in New Orleans.

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Mrs. Camille Alleman, who has been very sick in New Orleans for some time, arrived home last week much improved in health.

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We learn with deep regret the severe illness of Miss Felicie Prejean at Halfway plantation and hope for her safe recovery.

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Captain J. Dodd Smith made a flying trip to Baton Rouge last week.

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Mrs. E. H. Barton has just returned from Jefferson parish where she went to attend the funeral of her brother-in-law, Mrs. R. Perkins.

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Messrs. J. M. Coons and J.D. Smith Jr. visited the Clark plantation, Ascension parish, this week on business.

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A delightful dance was given by the young men of Assumption at the residence of Mrs. Henry Dupre Thursday night.

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Miss Eliza Daigle was the guest of her uncle, Mr. Sabin Savoie, Friday.

MAY 8, 1896

druggist

The funeral of the late Madame Brunet took place at 9:30 this morning at the Catholic church. Interment was made in the Catholic cemetery.

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About 1 o’clock yesterday fire was discovered in the residence of Mr. Gervais Gauthreaux at White Castle and an alarm was promptly sounded. By the time the fire department arrived the flames had spread rapidly and were beyond control and in a short time the building was completely destroyed. With the assistance of his neighbors, Mr. Gauthreaux was enabled to save a large portion of his furniture.
The fire was caused by a defective flue in the kitchen, which set fire to the roof and ceiling. The new chemical engine, owing to a mishap in the apparatus, was almost worthless, the only effective work being done by the bucket brigade. At the fire were Messrs. H. Cook Jr., Jake Walker, Jos. Coughlin and Judge Martinez of the Donaldsonville fire department and these gentlemen did effective service in their efforts to save the property of their former fellow citizen for Mr. Gauthreaux was at one time a resident of this city.

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Miss Blanche Bougere of St. Charles parish is the guest of Miss Fanny Foley. Miss Bougere is possessed of rare personal accomplishments and her pleasant disposition combined with her winning ways has won her many friends.

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Miss Angeline Landry of Bayou Goula is spending some time with her cousin, Mary Guedry of Paintcourtville. We note with pleasure that the Bayou has charms for her yet.

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Hon. John Marks, our representative-elect, has taken his departure for Baton Rouge to represent this parish in the legislature.

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We are sorry to mention that our popular and well esteemed friend, Clarence Jones, is confined to his bed with fever.

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Dr. Samuel Hicks of Shreveport was in the city today on a business visit.

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Judge Edmund Maurin will attend the inaugural ceremonies at Baton Rouge.

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Miss Edna Bourg is quite ill with measles. It is her second attack of the disease.

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Mr. Esteve Hidalgo of Palo Alto plantation was a welcome visitor to our city today and while here paid the Times a visit.

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We are extremely sorry to record that the infant child of Mr. George Goetz, our popular police officer, is lying extremely ill.

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Mrs. Henry Landry gave birth to a girl this morning. Mother and child doing well and Henry finds his old hat several sizes too small.

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Mr. W.W. Campbell, general baggage agent of the Texas & Pacific railway, was in town yesterday on business connected with his road.

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Messrs. Angeron, Lawrence and Coughlin made a trip to lower Iberville yesterday by wagon and returned last evening and report that the crops have a fine appearance and are growing rapidly.

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The steamer John Howard ran aground in the bayou yesterday and in answer to her signals of distress the tug Carrie B. went to her assistance and very soon had the steamer off the bar into deep water and the captain and the crew of the Howard breathed easier, for it looked at one time as of she was on the bar for good.

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A pretty little baby boy came to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Werner last week.

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Hon. John Marks of Assumption was in the city on Saturday on his way to Baton Rouge.

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Mr. George Landry of White Castle spent some time with friends and relatives in this city yesterday.

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Mr. John Martinez of the Belle Alliance plantation was among the arrivals in this city on Saturday.

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Miss Ella Turner and George Mart came up on the excursion from New Orleans yesterday and returned in the evening. While here they were guests of Widow Luke Eris and family.

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Rossia, the Italian who is in jail charged with the murder of Musumecia, will probably be arraigned for trial next week. The State is said to have a strong case against him. Rossia still remains uncommunicative regarding the killing and so far as known neither he nor his friends have yet secured counsel for him. Peronia, the actual murderer, continues to elude arrest and the authorities have little hope of ever capturing him, as he is believed to be out of the country.

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Two interesting bicycle races took place at the race track yesterday afternoon between John Nolan of this place and Kid Comeaux of New Orleans. In the first race, one mile, Comeaux took the lead at the start but was quickly overtaken and passed by Noal who had the lead until the end. Time, 3 minutes and 40 seconds. The second event, a quarter of a mile dash, was won by Comeaux in 41 seconds. The first race was for $5 and the second for $10.

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Ida Hall, the colored woman who was sick with small pox, died last night and was buried this morning. Her body was lifted from the bed and wrapped in a sheet, after which it was placed on a stretcher and carried to the cemetery and buried. The other cases are reported as progressing favorably.

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A little colored boy fell out of a flatboat on the bayou yesterday and was drowned.

 

MAY 12, 1896

baikes

Capt. W. S. Cary Sr., an old resident of this city, is supposed to have been drowned off the steamer J. E. Trudeau about 1 o’clock on Friday morning of last week. Mr. Cary left this city on Thursday evening on the steamer to visit his daughter, Mrs. W. T. Robertson, at Melville La. When the steamer reached the landing Clerk Louis Bergeron made the discovery that he was missing at once telegraphed this information to Mr. Cary’s son. The latter, greatly worried, however, had hopes that his father had gotten off at another place through a mistake or had gotten off at the right place without the clerk seeing him. He at once wrote to his sister and last night received a letter stating that their father was no there, which dispels all hopes and confirms the worst fears of the aged gentleman’s fate.

The supposition is that Mr. Cary wandered about the boat and in some accidental manner fell overboard near Old river. His son has ordered a search for the body in the vicinity where he is supposed to have been drowned.

Capt. Cary was a well known and much respected citizen of this city and his sad fate is received with every evidence of sadness and regret by all who knew him. He was a native of New York State, being born at Staten Island on May 17, 1821. When about 25 years old, he came to this State of which he has been a resident ever since, during the last 10 years residing in this city.

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Yesterday while cordelling his boat up the bayou, Signor Don Allen, the snake catcher, was kicked in the back and side by his horse, receiving injuries that may result fatally. Allen was opposite Paincourtville when the accident happened. The rope attached to the horse had become crossed over the animal’s back and when he attempted to remove it the horse began kicking and Allen was knocked senseless.

Painter Beal of this city, who is an old friend of Mr. Allen, was sent for and had him brought to this city. He was unconscious when placed in the boat and remained in that condition when the boat reached hear last night. His condition is still critical today, but his wife, who is in attendance upon him, has hopes of his recovery. Mr. and Mrs. Allen have been on a snake hunt down the bayou and secured some splendid specimens which they have with them now in this city.

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At 10:30 this morning the horse of Mrs. Bertau, that was hitched to a surrey and fastened in front of Cheap Tony’s store, became frightened by a passing dray, broke its hitching strap and started on a run down Mississippi street. Before the horse could be caught the surrey was quite badly damaged. The runaway horse frightened a horse attached to Sterken’s express wagon and it began to rear and plunge, finally breaking out of its harness, but causing no other damage.

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Mr. A. T. Carmouche of the Assumption Pioneer gave The Times a call on Sunday.

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Mr. J. C. Fernandez of Waggaman was in town Sunday, stopping with Mr. J. F. Fernandez.

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Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gondran of New River are stopping at the house of Miss Marie Blanchy.

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Mr. William Poche of St. James parish was in the city today. Mr. Poche came in to purchase a pump for watering his rice fields.

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Miss Josephine Ronquille at New Orleans came up on the excursion Sunday and while here was the guest of Mr. Edgar Ramirez and family. She returned home the same evening.

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We were agreeably surprised this morning to receive a call from smiling and portly Emanuel Blumenthal, formerly of this city, but now a prosperous merchant in Morgan City. Manny is accompanied by his amiable wife and interesting little child and they are the guests of his brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Geiger, where they will remain until tomorrow morning.

MAY 13, 1896

alabastine

An odd-looking craft of the houseboat order named the Lillie B and belonging to the Chadwick Snake Farm of Missouri, lying in the bayou near the railroad bridge, attracted the attention of a representative of this paper who paid it a visit last evening.

As the reporter stepped off the gang plank on the deck of the vessel, he was met by a woman who introduced herself as the wife of the owner and manager of the boat, Signor Don Allen, who is known all over the country as the “King of Snake Catchers.”

“Would you like to see some of our pets,” she asked and scarcely waiting for an answer which she took as an accepted fact, led the way to a small cabin in where cages with glass sides, filled with crawling reptiles half filled the little room. “These snakes here,” she said as she lifted a dozen or so big pilot snakes from a box “were all caught along the bayou here, most of them in the vicinity of Paincourtville, and we consider them very fine specimens.” While she was talking the snakes were twined about her neck, head and waist and were striking out their vicious-looking heads in all directions, causing the reporter more than once to involuntarily draw back.

“Here we have,” said the woman, diving into another box and bringing out another mass of writhing reptiles “the King snake, the enemy of every other snake. They are the only snakes that I know of that will kill and eat other reptiles. For that reason they are also known as the Cannibal snake.”

After showing off the good points of these snakes, they were all replaced in their den and a large, vicious copperhead was taken from a soap box. It was a remarkably pure specimen of these extremely venomous reptiles and was caught a few days ago just back of Paincourtville.

The woman then entered into a detailed story of how these snakes were captured by herself and husband. They use no sticks but pick them up with their hands. They carry with them always two remedies which they declare is a sure cure for any snake bite.

“As soon as my husband recovers from the injuries received by a kick from our horse, on yesterday, we will move up the bayou again in search of rattlesnakes, which are now in season. I was told by some men the other day that they had seen a big rattler, but when I got to the place I found it had just been killed by a couple of men. I was so vexed over this disappointment that I sat down and cried. It was a fine snake and was easily worth $15. We can generally sell to colleges, museums and zoological gardens all the snakes we can catch and what we cannot dispose of are sent to the farm.”

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Last evening shortly after 8 o’clock a collision took place on Railroard avenue opposite Mr. Desire Landry‘s residence between a horse ridden by Andrew Solozano and a bicycle being speeded by Bob Robertson. Young Solozano who had in his hands a bird cage and some dishes was thrown off the horse by the shock and the dishes scattered about the street, but strange to say none were broken. Robertson was thrown a distance of 10 feet but neither himself nor the bike were damaged. Both Solozano and Robertson were dazed for awhile and it took them a minute or so to realize what had happened.

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There is nothing new today relative to the sad drowning of Capt. W. S. Cary Sr. as reported in detail in yesterday’s issue. Capt. Cary Jr., his son, had a watch instituted for the body in the vicinity of Old river and it is hoped that it will be recovered. Up to noon today no word had been received by the family of its having been found, although it should have come to surface by this time.

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Lieut. Hubert Treille is today celebrating his 63rd anniversary, an event which is also being observed by two other distinguished citizens of Donaldsonville, ex-Governor Francis T. Nicholls and Miss Mathilde Comstock, a nun, now traveling in France as a representative of her order. There was a strange coincidence in these births, for Mr. Nicholls’ father was Judge of the parish, Mr. Treille’s father the Sheriff and Mr. John Comstock, Miss Comstock’s father, the Deputy Sheriff and Jailer. Mr. Nicholls was born in a house on the lot now occupied by his nephew, Mr. E. N. Pugh. Miss Comstock in the old jail building and Mr. Treille in a house on the corner of Chetimaches and Iberville street. These children grew up together and were very close friends and play mates. Messrs. Treille and Nicholls left Donaldsonville on the same day for school – Mr. Treille going to the Military College of Kentucky and Mr. Nicholls to West Point. A few days later, Miss Comstock entered Mount St. Mary’s Convent at Emmetsburgh, Md.

When the war broke out Messrs Treille and Nicholls joined Gen. R. E. Lee‘s army and received their promotions on the same day. Mr. Treille being made a lieutenant and Mr. Nicholls a general.

“When we were youngsters,” said Mr. Treille this morning when speaking of the strange coincidence of their birth, “our fathers being employed in the courthouse, we were constant playmates and our birthdays used to be jointly celebrated and we were almost inseparable.”

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Don Allen, who was badly injured by a kick of his horse down the bayou on Monday, is slowly recovering from his injuries, his condition today being very much improved.

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Police Juror A. J. Daigle of the eight Assumption ward, was in our city yesterday.
Mr. Edgar Ramirez returned from New Orleans on Monday night. He escorted Mr. Wm. Parks to the Soldiers’ Home.

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Pretty Miss Cora Levert, a favorite society belle of Iberville parish, is the pleasant guest of the Misses Irene and Ella Landry at their pretty home on Lessard Street.

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The infant child of Constable Geo. Goetz, whose life for several days was despaired of, we are pleased to note is improving and her complete recovery is confidently anticipated.

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Mr. Robt. Reynaud, better known as “Vallion,” a former resident of Donaldsonville, but now representing the Backus Fuel Saving Co. of Detroit, Mich., is in our city on business.

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Our printer friend, Felix Gaudet, spent a few hours in our city Sunday. He was on his way to Baton Rouge, where he is representing the New Orleans States during the session of the General Assembly. Felix is a Donaldsonville boy but is now a resident of New Orleans.

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Miss Anna Langbecker, who was credited in yesterday’s issue for the handsome decorations of the Volunteer hose carriage, writes to say that equal credit should be given to Misses Noemie and Bertha Mollere, whom she says were her coworkers in the decorations, those young ladies having made all the roses that formed the beautiful canopy.

MAY 14, 1896

photos

There is every reason to believe that the city has been finally and effectively rid of the small pox plague, providing the authorities take some action toward the removal of the Buzzards’ Roost and the other pest holes in that vicinity. Cases at present under Dr. Thibaut’s treatment are progressing nicely toward recovery and as there has been no further outbreak it is pretty safe to say that there will be no new arising from contagion with the present ones.

Dr. Thibaut, who has handled the outbreak with rare skill and judgment, is of the opinion that the warm weather and dying out of the disease in other places, making contagion less likely, has wiped out the plague here, but holds as he ever has that the sanitary conditions of places like Buzzards’ Roost makes them a constant menace and breeders of contagious diseases of all kinds. If they are not destroyed something should be done in the way of sanitation and purifying them at once.

The small pox situation at one time here was more serious than most people imagined but it is a credit to our people that they never lost their heads on good judgment and what might have created a panic in other places was treated here with a coolness that was something admirable and that showed the most implicit and perfect confidence in our health officers. That this confidence and trust was not over estimated or misplaced is proven by the gratifying results.

Dr. T. B. Rider, when questioned on the subject, said he thought that all danger of a further breakout was now passed but the authorities would do well to make some preparations against its reappearance next fall or winter, as the germs were undoubtfully yet about these places and if they weren’t burned down they should be treated to a thorough purifiction of some sort.

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A sharp lookout is being kept by men about the river for the bodies of the victims of the explosion of the Harry Brown on Monday.

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Yesterday about noon a colored man named John Richards, residing on the bayou about two miles from the city, saw the body of a colored man floating in the water and set out with his skiff and towed the body to the shore. Deputy Coroner T. A. Rider was notified and in company with a representative of this paper started down to view the body.

The body was lying in the water with the face downward and when turned over there was evidence that it had been in the water eight or nine days, as decomposition was quite well advanced. A careful examination failed to reveal any evidence of foul play and it was plainly evident that it was an accidental death. From the fact that the body was only attired in a thin shirt and drawers the supposition is that he must have walked off or fallen off one of the coal barges in the night time.
The body indicated that of a man about 25 years old, five feet nine in height and weighing about 170 pounds.

Dr. Rider did not deem an inquest necessary and gave an order to one of the men there to bury the body at once, which was done.

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Andrew Solozano must be under the baneful influence of a hoo-doo, for last evening he figured in another accident, in which, however he did not come out as fortunately as he did on the proceeding evening. It was almost 8 o’clock when he was speeding on his bike on Mississippi street, when Dominique Casso, also on a bike, loomed up and the two wheels came together in a dull thud collision. While the riders escaped injury, Solozano’s wheel will have to go into the hospital for broken down bikes for a few days’ rest.

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Last evening, Messrs. George Richard, H. O. Maher, Robert Landry and L. E. Bentley left for Bayou Corne with the purpose of raising havoc among the fish there. The party was well provided with bait of different kinds and it will be odd if they don’t have a good time. The party expects to return home some time tonight and there is a prospect of a glut in the fish market tomorrow.

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A most charmingly informal reception was tendered last evening in honor of Miss Cora Levert of Iberville by pretty Misses Irene and Ella Landry. Among those present were Messrs. H. Comstock, Walter Comstock, William A. Terrio, James Von Lotten and Miss Loulie Israel. During the evening there was some excellent music, both vocal and instrumental. Miss Ella Landry‘s piano and zither solos and the piano solos by Misses Irene Landry and Cora Levert being of unusual artistic excellence, as was also the vocal selections by Mr. H. Comstock. A delightful repast was served and the event was one of those charming gatherings that linger long in fond recollection. Miss Cora Levert, much to the regret of her friends, left for her home this morning.

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Mr. G. W. Bowie and his son, Don, came down from White Castle this morning and remained in the city until noon, when they returned home.

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The body of Capt. W. S. Cary Sr., who was drowned off the steamer J. E. Trudeau on Friday morning of last week, has been recovered and was buried yesterday at Brusly Landing by Justice E.O. Gwin of that place.

News of the recovery came in the following dispatch from Brusly Landing published in the New Orleans Picayune this morning: “Yesterday morning at 7 o’clock, Jake Turner, a negro was fishing in the river in front of Mr. L. Mouch‘s plantation, a mile below here, caught the body of an unknown white man and secured it until the arrival of the proper officers. The body, which was slightly decomposed, was that of a laborer, engineer or fireman, 60 years old, gray-bearded, bald-headed, except a few hairs tinged with grey, 5 feet 6 inches tall and had been in the water about five days.

He was dressed in a white cotton undershirt, dark striped woolen trousers, suspenders and white socks. He had $1.43 in a cloth bag, and in another pocket a piece of manila paper, on which was inscribed: “101, V. J. Carg (or Cary) Jr., Donaldsonville, La.” Coroner Caruth, being in attendance at the meeting of the Louisiana Medical Society, Justice Gwin viewed the body and issued a certificate in accordance with the above facts and buried the corpse on the river bank at the expense of the parish.”

A represenative of the Daily Times was the first to acquaint the family of Capt. Cary of the finding of the body and after they had read over the printed description unhesitatingly pronounced it that of their father and his son, Capt. Cary Jr., will go at once to Brusly Landing and have the body brought to the city for burial.

A letter received by the deceased’s son last night from the clerk of the steamer Trudeau stated that Capt. Cary’s coat had been found in his state room and that one of the engineers on the steamer felt positive that he saw something white drop off the boat about 1 o’clock on Friday morning and reported the same to the Captain of the steamer the next morning.

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Last evening two colored women of the ninth ward named Lucy Ayraud and Clara Washington became embroiled in a quarrel which led to blows, during which Clara, who is a much smaller woman than her antagonist, got the other down and was using her fists effectively, when Lucy’s sons, Raphael and Jonas, took a hand in the melee. Raphael drew a knife and stabbed Clara in the thigh while Jonas belabored her over the back with a hickory club. Clara was very badly hurt and had to be carried to her home where she was attended to by Dr. John R. Fridge.

Warrants were sworn out for the arrest of Lucy Washington and her two sons who were placed under arrest and arraigned before Justice J. M. Lusk who held them under bail to answer at the District Court.

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Mr. S. Goette Jr. has been out of the city for a couple of days on business connected with the enterprises in which he is interested.

MAY 15, 1896

  • operat
    Licensed to wed
  • Simon Dorsey to Isabella Brooks
  • William Henry to Doris Carter
  • Toby Turner to Carrie Johnson

 

A store and residence owned by A. Wilbert’s Sons, in Seymourville, were destroyed by fire yesterday. The store was occupied by Frank Seymour, in which he had nearly $700 worth of stock, which was an entire loss. The origin of the fire is unknown but it is supposed to have been the work of an incendiary. The two buildings were valued at $4,500 and were insured for about two-thirds of their value.

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Considerable indignation was expressed among Masons last night after reading the account in the Daily Times of how the body of Capt. Cary, who was a member of the Masonic Lodge of this city, had been buried by a stupid official at Brusly Landing as an unknown pauper, when his name and address were found on his body.

“I cannot imagine how an official could be so stupid as this,” said a prominent friend of the deceased. “Why the Captain’s name and address were found on his body and yet no effort was made to communicate with this place to see if such a person was missing. A telegram here would have been followed by a prompt answer to have the body cared for and prepared for shipment here. Instead of that they buried him as a pauper and up to this time no communication has been received from the officials there. It is a case that calls for investigation and I am in favor of making an example of such officials as they evidently have at Brusly Landing.”

Last evening Capt. Cary Jr. called up Rev. H. S. Johns of Plaqumine to the telephone and requested that the gentleman to see after the remains of his father and Mr. Johns went to Brusly Landing that morning. Mr. Cary will go up tonight and it is probable that the body will be brought here tomorrow for burial in which case the funeral will be in charge of the Masonic order.

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Lucas Locaylo and his son, Pedro, who was bitten by a mad dog about three weeks ago and went to St. James parish to have a mad stone applied to their wounds, have apparently escaped hydrophobia through this treatment, as they do not seem to show any symptoms of the approach of the rabies. The stone is said to have stuck fast to the wounds until it had absorbed all the poison. There was never any doubt as to the dog’s madness, as those who saw it unite in saying that it was in the most acute stage of the rabies.

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Mrs. Albert Comstock, one of our most estimable ladies, left this morning for Raccourci, Pointe Coupee parish, to join her daughter, Mrs. S. P. Lacour, who yesterday made Mrs. Comstock a grandmother. The new comer is a boy. Mrs. Comstock intends remaining with her daughter a month and during her absence her worthy sons will keep bachelors’ hall.

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  • Mr. J. Emile St. Martin was among the visitors to the city this morning.
  • Messrs. Jos. Dichary and Gus Melancon of Smoke Bend were in the city today.
  • Judge Joseph Carbo of the Third ward was circulating among friends in the city today.
  • Max Dupaty of the Welcome saloon returned from Bayou Corne last night and reports fishing there first class.
  • Mr. William Ware, the genial proprietor of Belle Grove store, Iberville parish, was a visitor to our city today.
  • Judge Edmund Maurin is taking a respite from his onerous and exacting judicial duties in a visit to New Orleans.
  • Mr. W. H. Phillips, the well known lumber dealer, who was in this city on business, has returned to his home at Saline by the way on Monroe on the steamer City of Camden.
  • Messrs. Maher, Richard, Landry and Bentley returned from their fishing trip to Bayou Corne last night. Fish, however, is selling at the old price in the market today.

 

MAY 18, 1896

official directory
The body of the late Capt. W. S. Cary Sr., who was drowned off the steamer Trudeau, was brought to this city Saturday evening and buried. The services at the grave were attended by relatives and personal friends only.

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Henry Loeb while riding his bicycle on Mississippi street on Saturday evening came in collision with a surrey driven by Mr. Frank Parrish. The wheel was badly damaged.

Shortly after the steamer Teche left here on Friday, Alfred Mann, one of the roustabouts, was arrested on a charge of robbing Charles Smith, another of the boat hands, of $6.90. The money was found on him and when the boat reached New Orleans on Saturday, Mann was arraigned before United States Commissioner Wright and held in $25 bond to answer at Court.

MAY 19, 1896

concert

A terrible accident occurred last evening about 5 o’clock at the sugar house on Mr. James Teller‘s Riverside plantation, resulting in the death of Joe Morton, a colored lad aged 17 years.

Morton was engaged in helping others raise one of the big rollers of the back mill which had been jacked up with blocks of wood. While at work under the roller the jack in some manner tilted causing the roller to drop eight inches, which forced out the blocks at one end, catching the boy under the bed plate when it came down, crushing him in a terrible manner about the stomach.

As quickly as possible the roller was raised and the boy drawn from beneath it and Dr. John D. Hanson was sent for. The doctor at once pronounced the injuries fatal and death came to relieve the suffering of the victim at 8 o’clock, just three hours after the accident.

Young Morton was highly thought of and a great favorite on the plantation and his terrible death is sincerely regretted by all.

Chief Engineer Jos. Worrell of the plantation was very much attached to the boy and when he began the raising of the roller, had made a request that Morton be sent to assist in the work.

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A squad of 24 convicts, 20 colored and four white, arrived here from Baton Rouge on last evening’s train and left early this morning on the steamer Louisiana for one of the convict camps down Bayou Lafourche, where they will be put to work on the levee. They were all new and fresh having just donned the stripes and made up a fine body of workmen.

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The celebrated pinchback breastpin case of Julia Lefort vs. Mary Hargins that has been before Justice Maurin‘s court the past two months has been decided in favor of the defendant, Judge Maurin rendering a long written opinion that will probably be often quoted by lawyers in similar cases as an unassailable authority.

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Lillian, infant daughter of Joseph E. Landry and Euphemie Medine, died at his parents’ residence, Port Barrow, on Monday. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon at the Catholic church, this city.

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The frame work of the new residence at the corner of Iberville and Lessard streets has been raised.

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Shortly after the steamer Stella Wilds left Donaldsonville on Saturday, Mate John M. Comeaux had trouble with a roustabout named Geo. Mason. On the arrival of the boat in New Orleans yesterday, Comeaux was arrested on a charge of assault and battery and was arraigned before United States Commissioner Wright. After examining several witnesses the commissioner placed Comeaux under $250 bonds to await a further hearing. The bond was promptly furnished.

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Our good looking confrere, Henry A. Winfree, editor of the Castilian of White Castle, was in our city today and gave us a pleasant call.

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Mr. Leon Godchaux of New Orleans has purchased the Madewood plantation of Mr. L. Pugh for the paltry sum of $30,000. We consider this place sold at a sacrifice of about one half its worth. In addition to this Mr. Pugh has turned over the place cultivated up to date with all expenses paid and $5,000 worth coal. This leaves him this beautiful place for a net of about $20,000.

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Prof. Geo. C. Bessonet of the Napoleonville High School paid a flying trip to Bull Run on a visit to his sister, but we presume he called on someone else’s sister. Very nice way we must say of killing two birds with the same stone.

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Luija Rossia, who was indicted in connection with Antonino Peroni for the murder of Rocco Musumeci, at the store of Rocco Savoja in March last, was arraigned for trial in the District Court this morning before Judge Walter Guion. The accused man being without counsel, Mr. Paul Leche was assigned by the court to look after the defense.

A jury was quickly impaneled and after Dr. E. K. Sims had given testimony as to the character of the wound a number of Italians were called. They gave their testimony in Italian which was interpreted to the jury. Their testimony was greatly muddled and it was with the greatest difficulty that anything could be made of it, outside of the fact that Peroni fired the shot that killed Musumeci and that Rossia gave him the pistol to do it with.

Mr. Leche, after the State had presented its case, stated that he would call no witnesses and would submit the case on argument to the jury. Short addresses were then made by Mr. Leche and District Attorney Billon after which Judge Guion charged the jury.

After delivering his charge the jury retired to deliberate on their verdict and the court took a recess until 2 o’clock. When court reassembled the jury had not yet reached a verdict and Judge Guion a recess until 4 o’clock.

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  • Mr. Max Geanelloni has returned from a two weeks stay with relatives at Biloxi, Miss.
  • Mr. Horace Mavor of Napoleonville spent Sunday in our city as the guest of Mr. E. N. Melancon.
  • Mr. Jos. Verret, a rising young law student of Napoleonville was in our city yesterday on business.
  • Mrs. O. Landry, the beloved wife of Capt. Ozeme Landry, left Sunday morning for New Orleans to spend some few days with her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Michel Maier.
  • Miss Laura Richard, the polite and courteous saleslady in the mammoth store of Netter & Co., returned home last evening from Abita Springs, after a few days sojourn at that splendid summer resort.

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J. B. Alcorn, colored, of Franklinville, Assumption parish, whom it was said had been whipped and ordered to leave the parish, this morning denied the statement. He said that he came to this city on Sunday on a visit to his cousin, Joe Thompson, and would return to his home today.

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Last night while Mr. E.N. Melancon was engaged at the ice factory hoisting ice, the handle of the crank which he was turning slipped from his hand and flying back hit him on the head, knocking him senseless. He was alone at the time and laid in this unconscious condition until one of the other workmen found him. He was taken to his home and while his injuries were severe they are not likely to prove serious.

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Quite a number of colored men have been run out of Assumption Parish the past two or three days, and most of them have found their way to this city.

This morning a reporter was informed by Deputy Sheriff H. O. Maher that he had heard that six colored men who had been badly whipped and one who had been shot in the arm had come into the city from the Second ward of Assumption Parish where the regulators had been very active.

Joe. Thompson was subsequently seen and said he knew of but three men who had been driven away, one of them named Reed, having been shot in the arm while fighting his way out from the regulators. Another man whose name he did not know claimed to have been whipped and the other, John Pugh, escaped without being punished.

The trouble seems to have arisen over the colored men having voted for Triche at the last election for Sheriff. Since that time, the regulators have been busy serving notices on the negros to quit the parish.

At the court house this morning, the work of the regulators was condemned by all the officials, Sheriff St. Martin being particularly severe in his strictures on the regulators and their work. His view was seconded by other officials and lawyers who thought that it was a rather late time in the day for methods like these.

An effort was made by the reporter to see the man Reed who had been shot, but he is said to have left here and gone to Plaquemine.

 

MAY 20, 1896

clerk

Fire broke out in a tenement house on the Evan Hall plantation about 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon and in a short time the house was completely destroyed. The occupant, Mr. Valentine Landry, succeeded in removing all of the furniture, but a great deal of it was badly damaged by the hasty removal which was necessarily done in a hurriedly and rather roughly manner.

At the time the fire was discovered, Mrs. Landry was quite ill, having been confined to her room as an invalid for several years, and had to be removed from the house in a chair.

A telephone was received in this city to get the engine in readiness in case the fire spread, but a few minutes after another message was received that the fire was confined to the house and the services of the engine would not be needed.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry McCall were on the plantation at the time the fire started, and both rendered valuable services, Mr. McCall in directing the efforts of the men fighting the fire and Mrs. McCall in directing the carrying away of the household goods.

The fire started in the kitchen and is supposed to have been caused by a defective flue. The house was valued at $600 and the damage to the furniture will increase the total loss to about $700.

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Oscar W. Landry, colored, a former resident of this city and a son of Rev. Pierre Landry, a presiding elder of the Methodist church, was shot and instantly killed by a negro named Thomas Smith at Navosta, Texas, on the 11th inst. Landry was the principal of the colored school at Navasota, and Smith, his murderer, was the leader of a faction that was trying to oust him from this position. Smith was arrested and with his wife, she is held as an accessory, will be placed on trial next Monday. Landry’s father and his brother, Palmerston, have left for Navosota to be present at the trial.

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The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Landry was christened on Monday by Father Dubernard being given the baptismal name of Beulah May Landry. Mr. Max Dupaty was godfather and Miss N. Mollere godmother. After the christening there was a delightful reception at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Landry where light refreshments were served to the guests and the little girl received many wishes for its health and prosperity.

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  • A little stranger arrived at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Gingry last evening. This makes the eight, but as all the others are girls, Junior is naturally elated and he celebrated the event with open-handed liberality.
  • Dr. L. E. Dufel of the first ward was in attendance at the District Court today.
  • The Misses Joseph, two beautiful young ladies from St. John parish, are in Donaldsonville visiting their cousins, the lovely Misses Feitel.
  • That estimable lady, Mrs. Charles Landry, of Half Way plantation in Assumption parish, was shopping and visiting friends in our city yesterday.
  • Mr. M.D. Dalferes is moving from Nicholls avenue to Lessard street in the house formerly occupied by Mr. A. F. LeBlanc, who moved further down the same street.
  • Miss Angele Duffel we are extremely sorry to record is quite seriously ill. There is a fear of a return of typhoid fever with which the young lady was dangerously ill some time ago.
  • We regret to learn of the serious illness of Master Walden, the bright and promising little son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles LeBlanc. The boy has been ill for some time but it is to be hoped that he will ultimately be restored to good health.
  • Messrs. W. B. Brazelton and G. M. Bowie, the former secretary and treasurer and the latter vice president of the White Castle Lumber and Shingle Co. Ltd, were among the visitors to our city yesterday on business. It afforded us pleasure to meet them.

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The acquittal of Rossia yesterday afternoon in all probability will be the last hear of the Musumeci murder as the authorities have no hope of ever capturing Peroni.

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Two more colored men who were run out of Assumption parish passed through the city yesterday on their way to Plaquemine.

 

MAY 21, 1896

whitecastle
Upon the opening of the District Court this morning the case of State vs. Clarence Parham, colored, charged with the murder of a negro named John Clayton on New River, was called for trial. Mr. E.N. Pugh appeared for the prisoner. Some time was taken before a jury was impaneled, after which the taking of the evidence was begun. From this evidence it appeared that the prisoner and Clayton had had a quarrel at New River, during which Parham claims he fired one shot to scare Clayton. The latter then pulled out a knuckle point and rushed on him, when he fired in self defense and killed Clayton. The case is still on.

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  • Mrs. A. Blum of Houma is here the guest of her brother, Mr. Felix Kahn, and his family.
  • Mrs. Chas. Bohn of Lutcher spent today in our city as the guest of her aunt, Mrs. Chas. Heintz.
  • Miss Julia Lowenstein of Houma is spending a while in our city as the guest of her cousin, Miss Florence Maas.

 

MAY 22, 1896

summerstyles
The case of the State vs. Clarence Parham, who was charged with the murder of John Clayton at New River, was concluded late last evening when the jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of guilty of manslaughter. Mr. E.N. Pugh made a vigorous defense for Parham, but the evidence of the State was too strong to overcome.

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The body of an Italian named Mano di Calogero Falco was found yesterday about 10 miles from this city just off the railroad track. The Coroners of both Iberville and Ascension were notified and both decided that the body was not in their parish so superintendent Pearsall of the Texas & Pacific railroad ordered the section foreman to bury the body, which was badly decomposed. The dead man’s son who is employed on the Glennan plantation was notified and on his arrival that his father had money in the Donaldsonville bank and as no bank book was found on him his son believed that he had been murdered and the bank stolen. The bank here was notified to withhold payment of money to any one claiming it. Cashier W. D. Park when seen this afternoon at the bank said the deposit was a small one. A complete examination of the body was made by Superintendent Pearsall but no marks of violence could be found. On the track near where the body laid was found an empty 38 cailbre cartridge shell.

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  • Miss Francis Bercegeay of Hohen Solms spent today in our city at the home of Mr. Auguste Barthelmy and family.
  • Miss Adeline Hemendinger of Assumption is spending a few days in the city as a guest of her friend Florence Maas.
  • The family of that experienced and successful sugar planter Mr. J. L. Lebermuth, co-owner of the magnificent Salsburg plantation, St. James parish, left on Tuesday to spend the heated term at Claiborne Cottage at Covington, La. Mr. Livermuth left this morning to join them.
  • Mrs. Meyer Netter, the kind and estimable wife of that enterprising merchant, Mr. Meyer Netter, of the firm of Netter & Co. of this city, who has been sojourning for the past four weeks at Abita Springs enjoying the balmy climate of that resort has returned home much benefited by her trip. She was accompanied home by her husband and her sweet little child, Ethel, who had been with her.
  • Miss S. Melancon of Port Barrow went out to attend to some business on Tuesday leaving a silver watch and gold chain in the room. While she was gone a colored man came to the house to buy milk and on her return Miss Melancon discovered that her watch and chain were gone. The colored man who had been in the habit of coming to the house every day is also missing and it is supposed that he took the articles.

MAY 25, 1896

succession
Saturday very shortly after 8 o’clock, Jerry Lamais, colored, employed on B. Lemann’s & Brother’s Dugas plantation, was shot and severely wounded by a colored woman named Sennie Rogers, in one of the cabins on the Riverside plantation.

Lemais, up to a week ago, had been employed on the Riverside plantation when he left and found work on the Dugas place. During his stay, at the Riverside plantation he had been living with a woman named Rogers, but when he left did not take her with him. On Saturday morning he went to the woman’s house to get his clothing which he left there and to get the balance of the wages due him and as he put in an appearance she took him to task for having talked disparagingly about her. After a few words had passed between them the woman went into the next room and as she remained there for some time Lamais opened the door to see what she was doing. As he did so he saw that she had taken his revolver and cartridges from his valise and fearing that she intended to shoot him started out of the house on a run and when he was about to climb a fence, despite his entreaties not to shoot, she fired, the ball hitting him in the shoulder and ranging downward towards the breast. He started to run, still pursuedby the woman, who had fired again but this time the ball merely grazed the skin of his back.

Immediately after the shooting the woman gave herself up to Theo. Landry, the second overseer on the Riverside plantation, who took her before Justice Raymond Landry, who committed her to the parish jail in this city to await the action of the District Court.

Dr. J. D. Hanson was summoned to attend the wounded man and after carefully examining his injuries pronounced his condition critical.

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What had every appearance of an attempt to rob the residence of Judge H.O. Maher on Saturday evening was frustrated by the timely appearance of Mrs. Maher on the scene, scaring the would-be burglars away. Mrs. Maher was away from the house chatting with one of her neighbors when one of her boys came up and she sent him away on an errand. The boy asked his mother if his father was at home and received a reply in the negative which was heard by a big burly colored man who was leaning against a water butt. The man started off toward Mr. Maher’s residence. Mrs. Maher, without divining the man’s intention, started a minute or so after homeward and coming in view of the house saw the man open the gate to go in. At this juncture, he evidently saw the lady for he hastened away, giving a whistle as he did so and was joined by another colored man and both moved away quickly.

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Saturday evening a quarrel arose between Oliver (Mickey) Rodeillat and a colored man named Garner over a game of craps that was being played in a house near the depot. Rodeillat slapped the colored man in the face and was in turn knocked down and badly beaten by Garner. On getting to his feet he drew his revolver and chased the colored man down the track, and getting within range fired and hit the negro in the knee. No arrests were made and the matter, it is said, has been quietly settled between the parties.

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Quite a number of our local fishermen spent yesterday at Bayou Corne and returned last night with marvelous stories of their catches. Among the party were Messrs Lawrence Brun, Leon Levy, Joseph Babin Jr., Alf. Landry, William A. Terrio, Ives Ramirez, Prosper Ganel Jr., Eugene LeBlanc, Gus Cire, F. Linde, Paul Wutke and Wm. J. Frank. Taking their individual accounts of fish hauled in, the bayou must be about destitute of the finny tribe today.

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  • Sheriff St. Martin leaves for Baton Rouge tomorrow with five prisoners who have been sentenced to the penitentiary.
  • Mr. D. J. Foley of Bayou Goula spent yesterday with friends in our city.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Gondran of Belle Helene were in our city yesterday as the guests of Mrs. Gondran’s sister, Miss Marie Blanchy.
  • Mr. Edward Park of this city who is a student at St. Mary’s Theological Seminary at Perryville, Mo., has been given the chair of belles lettres in that institution.
  • The ice wagon horse got a move on him Saturday morning and struck a gait out Railroad avenue and Mississippi streets that has put a notion in Rodriguez’s head to enter him in the next races over at the park.
  • Mr. Bernard Lemann will spend the summer in Maine for the benefit of his health, which has been run down of late by too close application to business. The best wishes for his recovery to complete health will go with him from his numerous friends.
  • The Lugger “Pelican” which has been sold for debt by Mr. Louis Dehon and had been hauled out on the bank opposite his cooper shop, was set on fire and burned up on Friday night. A colored man named Buddy McNeil, a minstrel performer who had been sleeping in the boat, was found to have small pox and after he had been removed the boat was set on fire.

 

MAY 26, 1896

strangershome

  • The friends of Miss Felicie Prejean learn with pleasure that she is again up after a severe illness.
  • Miss C.B. Gustine of New Orleans is visiting her sister, Mrs. A. Leo Greenwood.
  • Mr. C. Melancon of Paincourtville is quite ill.
  • Miss Lillian LeBlanc, one of Assumption’s fairest debutantes, is just recovering from an attack of measles.
  • Mr. J. J. Claverie and wife, lately of Donaldsonville, have now made their home with Mr. H.C. Wilson and family of the Palo Alto plantation.
  • Mr. Alfred Munch of Plaquemine spent Wednesday of last week with his cousins, Mr. J.O. Ayraud and family.
  • Dr. S. D. Gustine and Mr. C. Dodd, both of New Orleans, paid a flying visit to friends on the bayou recently.
  • Mrs. Chas. Rice of Bowietown, Lafourche parish, was here Sunday on a visit to friends.
  • Mr. Joseph Crowley, the well known mechanical engineer, was a welcome visitor to our city today. Mr. Crowley represents Payne & Joubert, the well known sugar machinery manufacturers of New Orleans.
  • Sheriff St. Martin who had made all preparation for taking to Baton Rouge today the prisoners in the parish jail sentenced to the penitentiary, postponed the trip until tomorrow on account of the death of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Lea Leroy.
  • A. H. Combes, an employee at the Donaldsonville ice factory, was quite badly hurt about the legs and feet last evening by a heavy piece of ice that he was engaged in lifting, falling on him. His feet were quite badly bruised and crushed and he had to be assisted to his home.

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Beatrice Montecino, 10 years of age, fell while jumping a rope in the yard of Ascension Academy at noon today and broke her right arm. She was assisted home and Dr. T. H. Hanson summoned who set the fractured bone. The little one has just come from the school room and was on her way home when the accident happened.

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It is with regret we announce today the death of Mrs. Lea Leroy, nee Dugas, the estimable wife of Mr. Alcide Leroy, at her home at 11 o’clock last ninth in her 36th year of her age. The illness was of short duration and her death therefore is a great shock to her relatives and friends. Deceased, who was a sister-in-law of Sheriff Sam. St. Martin, was a most estimable and lovable woman, a faithful wife and a devoted mother and her loss to those who knew and loved her best is irreparable. The funeral took place this afternoon at the Catholic church and was very largely attended.

MAY 27, 1896

lumber
Sheriff Sam St. Martin left for Baton Rouge with the following prisoners this morning: Clarance Barham, sentenced to six years; Vincenze Tortorich, sentenced to 18 months; and Andrew and Joseph Foster, sentenced to six months. The Sheriff was accompanied by Frederick Landry and both are expected back tomorrow. Parham who goes to the penitentiary for six years was convicted of manslaughter in killing a man at New River.

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Albert Gauthreaux and Charley Cook have gone into the gumbo-fealey business.

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Delora Melancon, infant daughter of Arthur J. Melancon and Victoria Oubre, died last evening at her parents’ residence on the Salsburg plantation, St. James parish. Her funeral took place this afternoon at the Catholic church, this city.

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Jerry Lamais, colored, who was shot on the Riverside plantation by a woman named Sennie Rogers, as previously reported in this paper, is said to be on a fair road to recovery. The woman who is in jail here, will probably be given a preliminary hearing on a charge of assault with intent to kill, and if she can find bail, will be released. Lamais’ wound which was in the shoulder was a serious one but responded favorably to Dr. Hanson’s treatment.

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Dr. McGalliard has been confined to his home the past few days through illness, which is fortunately not of a serious character.

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Dr. John D. Hanson has been ill and unable to attend to his professional duties but his rapid recovery to perfect health again is confidently anticipated.

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Mr. James Teller of the Riverside plantation is quite sick and it was deemed advisable by his attending physicians to send to New Orleans today for Dr. Souchon for consultation.

MAY 28, 1896

imports
Apparently if you laid in supplies in 1896, everyone knew what you ordered. 

Clarence Parham was not among the prisoners taken to the penitentiary yesterday by Sheriff St. Martin as announced in yesterday’s issue. An appeal was taken in his case and he will remain in parish prison until this appeal is decided.

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On Saturday evening while Rev. A. Martin was dining with Dr. McGalliard at the latter’s residence, a sneak thief entered and stole Rev. Martin’s hat and umbrella. The loss was not discovered until he was about to make his departure. Our reverend friend escaped much easier than did a distinguished divine in Chicago a short time since who was robbed on Saturday evening of every article of clothing he possessed and appeared in the pulpit the next morning in a dressing gown.

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Miss Ida Breaux, the beautiful and cultured daughter of Mr. J. Monroe Breaux of Burnside, was in our city this morning shopping.

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Deputy Sheriffs Alex. Bertin and P. Gilbert of Assumption parish were in the city today on their way to the insane asylum in Jackson with a colored woman from Napoleonville.

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A petition is being circulated asking the legislature to remove the leper hospital from the Indian Camp plantation opposite White Castle to a more isolated locality in White Castle and Plaquemine.

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Mr. Edward N. Pugh Jr., after spending a few days here with his parents and a couple of days with his Baton Rouge friends, returned to Waverly plantation, Lafourche parish, this morning.

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Mrs. Sims, the wife of Ascension’s distinguished lawyer and able Senator, R.N. Sims, we regret to say has been confined to bed since Saturday with an attack of fever. Her manly and handsome son, Frank, a page in the Senate chamber at Baton Rouge, came to visit his mother yesterday and returned to resume his work this morning.

 

MAY 29, 1896

hat
That charming lady, Mrs. T.O. Dalferes, of this city spent Wednesday as a guest of Mrs. Buford, the estimable wife of Mr. W.W. Buford of Port Barrow.

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Dr. W. M. McGailliard is about again receiving the congratulations of his many friends over his recovery. The doctor is too valuable a citizen to have laid up with sickness.

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Licensed to wed

  • Andrew J. West to Rebecca Cole
  • Ambroise Doblan to Estella Anthony
  • W. H. Jones to Sarah Watson
  • Arthur Smith to Manette Johnson
  • Frank Lacave to Florence Parnell

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Last night about eight o’clock while running on the sidewalk in front of the residence of Mr. J. J. LaFargue, Lawrence Casso, the little son of Lucien Casso, was attacked by a small dog belonging to Mr. LaFargue and severely bitten about the legs. The screams of the child attracted the attention of passers by who drove the dog away and took the child to his home where his injuries were attended to.

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